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Bald is no barrier to shaving for charity

For immediate release

27 March 2014

Bald is no barrier to shaving for charity

Auckland resident Mark Nalder is this week proving there really is no excuse for not taking part in Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand’s annual fundraiser Shave for a Cure.

Mark has been looking to get involved in the event for a number of years, but has been faced with the challenge of having no hair to start with.

“When discussing this with friends at work, I made the mistake of saying something along the lines of 'if I had hair to shave, I'd be keen as'. One thing led to another and before you know it they'd hatched a plan for what we’ve called a reverse shave,” says Mark.

Last week Mark spent the official Shave Week (March 17 – 23) continuing fundraising for his reverse shave. He has committed to wearing a wig, chosen by voting through his supporters, for two whole days including at work, meetings and at home.

As part of his fundraising efforts he also agreed that for every $500 raised he will wear it for one extra day. His voters chose between three wigs including ‘the windswept’, ‘80s metal band’ or the ‘ringo’.

Mark’s fundraising efforts have netted $1,140 which will see him wear the ‘windswept’ wig continuously for four days this week.

What originally started as a light hearted discussion has evolved into a serious fundraising effort, although Mark says the implications of his wig-wearing weren’t originally completely thought through.

“I have some important client meetings this week and I’ll be attending in my full wig attire. At the end of the day though this is a light hearted approach to what is an incredibly serious and life threatening illness for New Zealanders living with blood cancers and related blood conditions.

“I’m happy to do my bit and find a way to participate in this wonderful fundraiser,” adds Mark.

Mark is not alone in his fundraising efforts for Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand (LBC), with a number of his colleagues at workplace Fidelity Life shaving their hair for the cause. The company has jointly raised more than $17,000 through their shave efforts.

"We are so very appreciative of the fantastic fundraising by both Mark and Fidelity Life who are long term supporters of LBC. To raise over $17,000 for Shave for a Cure is a stunning achievement,” says LBC CEO Pru Etcheverry.

Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand (LBC) is the national charity dedicated to supporting patients and their families living with blood cancers and related blood conditions.

The organisation does not receive government funding – the dollars raised from Shave help fund core services including patient support, support and funding for research, awareness and advocacy.

ends

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