News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Health warning removed for algal blooms on the Selwyn River

March 31, 2014

Health warning removed for algal blooms at Glentunnel and Whitecliffs on the Selwyn River

The Community and Public Health division of the Canterbury District Health Board has lifted its algal bloom health warnings issued at Whitecliffs and Glentunnel on the Selwyn River / Rakahuri, issued on January 20, 2014 and February 14, 2014 respectively.

Recent surveys at Whitecliffs and Glentunnel on the Selwyn River / Rakahuri have shown the quantity of potentially toxic blue-green algae (benthic cyanobacteria) in the river has decreased and concentrations are now below the levels that are of concern to public health.

Dr Alistair Humphrey, Canterbury Medical Officer of Health, says Environment Canterbury’s sampling for the summer season has now stopped and therefore the public will need to be aware of the potential for algal blooms themselves.

“The growth of blooms is however unlikely because of the cooler weather and the seasonal nature of the blooms,” Dr Humphrey says.

“Environmental Canterbury will resume sampling again next summer when there is an increased likelihood of cyanobacterial growth.”

Facts about cyanobacteria:

• Appears as dark brown/black mats attached to rocks along the riverbed.
• The algae occur naturally but can increase rapidly during warmer months.
• It often has a strong musty smell and algal toxin concentrations can vary over short periods with changing environmental conditions.
• Although high river levels will remove the algal bloom, detached mats can accumulate along the shore and increase the risk of exposure to toxins.
• If a health warning is in place avoid contact with the water.
• Although district or city councils may place warning signs, these may not be seen at the numerous river access points, hence the need for people/ dog walkers to treat every low-flowing river cautiously.
• Exposure to an algal bloom can cause skin rashes, nausea, stomach cramps, tingling and numbness around the mouth and fingertips. If you experience any of these symptoms visit your doctor immediately and please let your doctor know if you have had contact with lake water when there is a health warning in place.

For further information visit http://ecan.govt.nz/services/online-services/monitoring/swimming-water-quality/Pages/river-warnings.aspx

Or contact Community and Public Health on (03) 364 1777.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news