News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Cervical cancer vaccination reminder

West Coast DHB urges young girls and their families not to forget about cervical cancer vaccination


The West Coast District Health Board is urging parents of Year Eight girls not to forget to return their consent forms indicating whether they want their daughter to receive the HPV vaccine against cervical cancer.

Janet Hogan, West Coast DHB Clinical Manager, Immunisation says consent forms were sent to all parents of Year Eight girls (in the participating schools) on the West Coast nearly a month ago.

“Most parents have signed and returned the forms to us to let us know if they want their daughter to be vaccinated or not, however, we still are waiting to hear from around 10% of the people who received the consent forms."

Every year 150 New Zealand women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and 50 die from the disease. More than 70 percent of cervical cancers are caused by Human Papillomavirus (HPV), which is spread through sexual contact.

Dr Cheryl Brunton, West Coast Medical Officer of Health says, “As prevention is better than cure, we urge parents not to forget about this important vaccination – the only vaccine available that prevents cancer.”

The vaccine is given to girls from the age of 12 as a series of three injections over a six-month period. It is available either through high schools, or in some areas such as Karamea, Haast and Moana, through the local rural clinic. The vaccine is also available free to girls up until 20 and if a young woman is no longer at school she can receive the vaccination at her GP or Family Planning free of charge.

“This year our Public Health Nurses are looking forward to working with Westland High School to vaccinate girls at the school, rather than at the Hokitika Health Centre. Working in partnership with the school will mean best health and education outcomes for the girls,” says Dr Brunton.

“For best protection girls need to be vaccinated before they are exposed to HPV, that is before they start having any sexual contact. Vaccinating girls and young women now will reduce their chances of getting cervical cancer later in life.”

The HPV vaccination programme in Greymouth has already started. It is expected to start in Hokitika in the second week of April.

-ENDS-

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news