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Motorists urged to slow down, buckle up and stay safe

Motorists urged to slow down, buckle up and stay safe

22 April 2014 - Motorists are being reminded to stick to the basics following a tragic Easter weekend on the nation's roads.

Four people died in crashes this Easter weekend, the highest number of road deaths for the period in three years. Last Easter, three people died, while there were no deaths in 2012.

Acting National Manager Road Policing, Inspector Nic Brown, said the deaths were a tragic and disappointing result.

"As far as Police is concerned, one death on the roads is one too many, and we feel for those families who have lost loved ones. We again ask that everyone on the roads over the next week and beyond does their part to keep themselves safe, so that we don't see any more families left grieving, or any more New Zealanders left with lifelong injuries," Mr Brown said.

While Police and road safety agencies were committed to keeping the roads safe and reducing deaths and injuries, they could not do it alone, Mr Brown said.

"Sadly, it's still the simple things that are seeing too many people killed and injured. We ask everyone to do their bit by slowing down, wearing their seatbelt, staying off the booze and driving to the road and weather conditions, with passengers, friends, family and whanau also having an important role in encouraging drivers to do the right thing. It's basic stuff."

Mr Brown said Police would be maintaining a highly visible presence on the roads over the remaining week, as many people continued to enjoy a 10-day extended Easter and Anzac break. Police would be targeting unsafe behaviours, with a particular focus on speed through strict enforcement of the reduced 4km/h threshold through until 6am next Monday (28 April).

“We know that people make mistakes on the road, but that shouldn't cost life or limb. People also need to be mindful that holiday driving is typically more risky than at other times, as there are usually more cars on the road and people driving longer distances, often on unfamiliar roads.

"Distractions such as cellphones, electronic gadgets and children in the car can also add to the risk, with the potential for frustration to set in, particularly at the beginning and end of the holiday period as large numbers of people are travelling to and from home and roads become heavily congested. We therefore urge everyone to be patient and allow plenty of time for their journey so that they arrive at their destination safely, as we do not want to see any one else killed or left with life-altering injuries. We all need to play our part."


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