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Why two thirds of children are wearing the wrong size shoe

Why two thirds of children are wearing the wrong size shoe!

What size shoe does your child wear?

Does it constantly change depending on the style or brand?

And how long before they grow and need another size altogether?

Buying kids’ shoes isn’t easy But the problem is made worse by the fact there’s no accurate or consistent labelling system. A size 10 in one brand isn’t the same length as a size 10 in
another! And US, UK and NZ sizing doesn’t always match up.
Kids under 5 aren’t good at deciding whether a shoe fits well or not. Their nervous systems aren’t fully developed, so even if a shoe is much too small they don’t feel any discomfort.

So how do you find the perfect fit?

The answer is surprisingly easy. Measure your child’s foot then add 12mm.

Extensive research in Austria shows this will guarantee you get the right size shoe that won’t cause long-term damage to your child’s feet.

Why getting the right size matters

Badly fitting shoes can:

• Cause blisters and reddened skin

• Distort the natural position of the toes, causing joint pain and bunions

• Lead to muscle and tendon pain

• Shorten the foot muscles

• Cause circulatory problems like varicose veins or sensations of cold and numbness

• Cause a change in posture resulting in knee, hip and back problems.

Why 12mm is the key

Shoes are designed to flex in a certain spot underneath the ball of your foot.

If shoes are too long or too short, this ‘break line’ will be in the wrong place and can cause skeletal and muscular problems.

12mm will ensure the break line is correct no matter what brand of shoe you buy.

Kids’ feet are as soft and pliable as rubber, so they can squeeze into shoes that are too small. But if stress is placed on the soft sections of their bones, permanent damage can be done. This will affect their joints and determine how they walk or run for the rest of their lives.

What to look for when buying shoes

Foot Mechanics suggests you follow these simple steps:

• Trace the outline of your child’s foot. Add 12mm to the length, and cut

a strip of paper from their longest toe to their heel. Use this as a

measuring guide when shopping.

• Put your thumb and fingers on either side of the shoe and do a

‘squeeze test’. There should be room for the material to give a little. If it’s too tight there’ll be too much pressure on the side of the foot.

• Use laces or Velcro straps to tighten the width if there’s too much room.

• Always measure both feet as they’re not always exactly the same size.

• Buy shoes late in the day. Our feet expand in both length and width during the day, and kids are no exception.


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