News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Duck Hunters reminded of toxic algae in Canterbury lakes

May 2, 2014

Duck Hunters reminded of toxic algae in Lake Ellesmere and Lake Rotorua

Hunters are being reminded to avoid contact with two Canterbury lakes this duck shooting season because of toxic algae (Cyanobacteria).

This year’s duck shooting season officially opens tomorrow, Saturday, May 3.

The Community and Public Health division of Canterbury District Health Board is warning people the toxic algal bloom, for Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere near Christchurch and Lake Rotorua near Kaikoura, remains in place as duck shooting season approaches.

Dr Ramon Pink, Canterbury Medical Officer of Health, says the lakes are still in bloom with concentrations of blue-green algae (planktonic cyanobacteria) above the levels considered to be safe for recreational activities.

“People should avoid contact with these lakes until the health warnings have been lifted, as there is increased probability of respiratory, irritation and allergy symptoms from exposure to the high density of the cyanobacterial material present,” Dr Pink says.

Algae are particularly harmful to dogs and hunters are recommended not to let their pets come into contact or drink water from the lakes, he says.

“No one should drink the water from the lake at any time. Boiling the water does not remove the toxin.”

Dr Pink says hunters should also wash their hands thoroughly if they come into contact with the lake water or when handling ducks from the lake.

“Ducks from the lake are fine to cook and eat if their gut has been removed.”

Environment Canterbury continues to monitor the lake and will inform Community and Public Health when it no longer contains algae concentrations harmful to public health.

Facts about cyanobacteria:
• The algae occur naturally but can increase rapidly during warmer months
• If the water is cloudy, discoloured, or has small globules suspended in it, avoid all contact
• Not all cyanobacterial blooms are visible and toxins can persist after the blooms disappear
• Cyanobacterial concentrations can change quickly with changing environmental conditions (e.g. wind). If a health warning is in place avoid contact with the water.

For further information visit http://ecan.govt.nz/services/online-services/monitoring/swimming-water-quality/Pages/lake-warnings.aspx

Or contact Community and Public Health on (03) 364 1777.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

TV3 Video: Auckland Arts Festival Kicks Off

The Auckland Arts Festival kicks off March 4, with artists from New Zealand and all over the world on show. More>>

ALSO:

Te Matatini: Minister Applauds National Kapa Haka Festival

Education Minister Hekia Parata wishes the best of luck to everyone involved in this week’s national kapa haka festival, Te Matatini, in Christchurch. “Te Matatini showcases the very best of Māori performing arts talent. It’s a celebration of identity, language and culture at the highest level and I’m looking forward to being amongst it,” says Ms Parata. More>>

ALSO:

Kiwi Pride: Accolades For Film About Man Who Falls In Love With A Stick

A short animated film written and directed by New Zealand born Matthew Darragh has been selected for the Courts des îles, International Festival of Short Fiction Films. More>>

ALSO:

Anniversaries: Vivid Memories Four Years After Christchurch Quake

Four years ago, an earthquake that would change the lives of thousands shook Christchurch at 12.51 p.m. More>>

ALSO:

Environment 'n' Conservation: Slash Meets Tāne The Tuatara

Rock and Roll superstar and former Guns 'n' Roses guitarist Slash visited Zealandia Ecosanctuary along with collaborating band Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. More>>

Canterbury Quakes: Feedback Sought On Short-Listed Memorial Designs

Six short-listed designs for the Canterbury Earthquake Memorial have been released for public input... The Memorial will honour the victims of Canterbury’s earthquakes and acknowledge the suffering of all those who lived through them as well as the heroism of those who participated in the rescue and recovery operations. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news