News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Trainee Nurse Aims to Make a Difference

Trainee Nurse Aims to Make a Difference

Nursing practice experience in Hawke’s Bay hospitals has shaped final-year degree student Nayda Heays’ ambition to work in an acute nursing setting like intensive care.

When she launched into studies at EIT in her late thirties, Nayda says she wanted to save the world.

“Applying for scholarships, I stressed that I wanted to look at working in areas that addressed inequality and disparities in health services. Doing practicums opened my eyes. I still have the same passion, but in reality I know getting there is much harder than I imagined.”

Working in intensive care, Nayda noticed many of the patients were Maori.

“A lot of admissions are from isolated communities and these patients may not be able to verbalise what they want. As nurses, you have to pick on these cues, breaking down barriers in health care.”

Nayda’s parents are Tuhoe, and her family has lived in Napier since she was six. “It feels like home to me,” she says of Hawke’s Bay. After leaving Napier Girls’ High School, she worked for several years as a law clerk before travelling overseas.

Returning home, she met her future husband, Andrew Heays. The couple have two daughters, Grace, 15, and 11-year-old Phoebe.

It was working part-time as a community health worker and then full-time as a community services manager in Rotorua that stirred Nayda’s interest in helping those struggling with health care issues.

Her mother, Florence Coffin, started nurse training and raised four children before going back to a caregiving position in a Hastings rest home where she continues to work in her seventies. Nayda says achieving her degree is as much for her mother as for herself.

While looking forward to finishing her studies in July, she will miss her lecturers and classmates.

“EIT does feel a bit like another home. I’ve forged amazing relationships here and felt sad on the last days of lectures.”

Assistant Head of School Jennifer Roberts says Nayda has been an exemplary student, supporting classmates – particularly Maori students. Last year, she secured funding which allowed her and fellow students to attend the Maori Council of Nurses’ annual student nurses hui in Nelson.

“After my last clinical placement in coronary care, the next step is the transition into practice,” Nayda says. “I’m excited about the placement as it will consolidate my learning. It’s the light bulb moment when it doesn’t seem so hard anymore.”

Later this month she will be awarded the Rotary Club of Taradale’s annual EIT Award for Excellence. Nayda also gained three scholarships while at EIT and she serves as treasurer for Te Roopu Take Take, a Maori Bachelor of Nursing student-led support group.

A team swimmer for Ironmaori, she competes in the half and quarter Ironman. This year, she will be cycling for the event, while Andrew will do the running and Grace the swimming.

“I’m in the drink with Grace as I’m teaching her how to swim in her wet suit. It will be a 45km cycling stint. I don’t know that I’m built for that,” she laughs.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news