News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Paediatric Enrolled Nurse Still Passionate After 36 Years


Paediatric Enrolled Nurse Still Passionate After 36 Years







Registered nurse Rae Richmond with enrolled nurse Kate Phillips
.


Ask Kate Phillips if she enjoys nursing and the answer comes in one word, “passionately”.

The Hamilton enrolled nurse doesn’t even call what she does a job, to her it is a vocation something she feels privileged to be doing four days a week at Waikato Hospital.
In the 36 years she’s been at the hospital – off and on given she had two daughters - Kate describes the delight she gets out of working with families and sharing her knowledge with them.

“Nursing is a great career. Male or female, it doesn’t matter. Shift work does put some off but you can make it work around families.

“There is just such a variety. Hospital or community based, occupational health, general practice, anything really.

“There are so many (other) things nurses can do with their training. You can go into management, do your Masters, whatever you want. Nurses have to be lateral thinkers and have common sense and that is what holds them in good stead,” she says.

Enrolled nurses, formerly called community nurses when Kate finished her training, work under the direction and delegation of a registered nurse to deliver nursing care and health education in home, community, residential care and hospital settings.

The difference between the two is the length of time spent training. Enrolled nurse training is now an 18-month diploma course at polytechnics while registered nurses train for three years, also at polytechnics, and then spend a year having practical experience in a health setting.

There have been many changes over the years for enrolled nurses. On 31 May 2010, the scope of practice for enrolled nurses and nurse assistants changed. The new scope of practice enables enrolled nurses to make a broader contribution to health services and give greater support to registered nurses.

Kate did have opportunities to become a registered nurse but babies, hesitancy about mastering computer technology and the hands on nature of the role means she is proud to call herself an enrolled nurse.

She wonders though about the training at polytechnics simply because she remembers with great fondness the training and living together on site. At Waikato Hospital it was in the Hockin Building, now home to Waikato District Health Board’s corporate office.

“It was team bonding. After that we knew each other. We got rotated around the hospital every six months – medical, surgical, basics and then specialities.”

For Kate it was paediatrics – caring for children – that became her great love. The speciality of paediatric orthopaedics appealed most of all and she considers it a career highlight to have worked alongside the late Dr David Clews, who died in 2007.

“He was a wonderful man. He was such a visionary. His passion rubbed off on other people.”

In recent years, Kate has worked in the Waikids surgical ward one day a week and three days in Waikids children’s clinic.

“We have contact with 180-200 children in a week. We like to make the hospital system run smoothly for our families.”

Out of work she spends a lot of time with her family, particularly her two grandsons aged 2 and 3.

She is confident she has a good many years nursing left in her. So what about that ageing nursing workforce? She considers she has just as much to contribute now as she did in her 20s.

“As a team member, the knowledge and experience gained over the years allows me to use this in my practice and to share with my colleagues.

“I see the young nurses coming out from Wintec. There are some amazing good focussed young nurses coming through.

“Working in a hospital teaches them so much. Most want to come and work in a hospital setting to expand and consolidate exactly what they’ve learned and then, with the experience gained, make decisions for the future.”

Kate enjoys the multi-cultural nature of the nursing workforce too.

“You learn so much about other cultures,” she says.

But in the end Kate is still an enrolled nurse all these years later because she wants to help people, particularly young people.

“There isn’t a day where I ever regret becoming a nurse,” she says.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

EPMU: Fourth Anniversary

Representatives of the Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union are proud to stand with the Pike River families to mark four years since 29 men lost their lives. More>>

ALSO:

'Kindara': Unusual Ginger Coloured Kiwi Chick Released To Taupo Creche

A cute little kiwi chick with an unusual ginger tinge to its feathers has just been released to Wairakei Golf & Sanctuary Kiwi Creche in Taupo after hatching at Rainbow Springs' Kiwi Encounter. More>>

Werewolf: The Complicatist : Bob Dylan Himself, And By Others

Bob Dylan is about to release a six CD version of the entire Basement Tapes sessions he recorded with the Band 40 years ago. To mark the occasion, I’ve rustled together some favourite cover versions of Dylan songs, and a few lesser-known tracks by the great man. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf: Gone Girl : The Trouble With Amy

Philip Matthews: Three words to describe the David Fincher film Gone Girl: cynical, topical and ridiculous. Ridiculous isn’t a negative. More>>

ALSO:

11/11: Armistice Day Peace Vigils

On Armistice Day 2014, the second in the series of peace vigils that will take place three times each year during the World War One centenary will be held in Hokianga, Whangarei, Auckland, Tauranga, Otaki, Lower Hutt, Wellington and Takaka. More>>

ALSO:

Te Papa: Rick Ellis Appointed New Chief Executive

The Board and Chairman of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa are pleased to announce the appointment of Rick Ellis as the new Chief Executive for the museum. More>>

Couture: New All Blacks Jersey Gets Team’s Seal Of Approval

More than two years in the making, adidas has today unveiled the most technologically-advanced and blackest All Blacks jersey ever, four days before the highly anticipated match against England. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news