News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


College of GPs welcomes funding for child health care

College of GPs welcomes increased funding for child health care

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners (RNZCGP) has welcomed the increase in funding for GP visits for children, which will assist GPs in delivering a better, more efficient primary health care service for children, young people and their families.

“The $90 million to make GP visits and prescriptions free for children aged under 13 from 1 July 2015 will go a long way towards improving access to primary care services for families with young children,” says RNZCGP President Tim Malloy.

“Targeting a greater subsidy to the primary health care needs of our children is an investment in the future wellbeing of our country, and may also help address the issue of health care equity in New Zealand.

“Evidence is emerging that suggests that zero fees to under 6s had an impact on hospitalisations as parents began taking their children to GPs when symptoms emerged rather than when they became critical. It is reasonable to expect a similar outcome in older children which will potentially put more pressure on general practices.

“Children form a large part of the population that GPs treat and raising awareness and access to immunisation, and early intervention care is crucial in the general health and wellbeing of a child.

“This, in addition to the previously announced $20 million investment to expand the number of free drop-in sore-throat clinics to target a further 90,000 children and young people who are at risk of getting rheumatic fever; as well as an extra $6.3 million for a bilateral cochlear implants programme for children, are good steps towards improving youth-specific primary care.

“There is no doubt that over the coming years, there will be increasing pressure on the primary health sector as more is expected of it, and the divisions between primary, secondary and social care become more blurred. We need to be ready for this with theright resources and funding initiatives,” Dr Malloy says.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

John McBeth: Our World Cup All Blacks

Forty or fifty years ago nobody really had any idea of what the selectors had in mind. There were often several trials, which sometimes featured over 150 players, possibly an inter island match or a final trial, then we listened to the announcement of the team on radio. The players weren't flown into the capital for a parliamentary function... More>>

ALSO:

Game Review: Midsomer Murders Meets First Year Philosophy

Developed by The Chinese Room, Everybody's Gone to the Rapture sees the player exploring what appears to be a recently abandoned idyllic English village trying to figure out where everybody's gone. Spoiler: they've gone to the rapture. (On a serious note, this review contains plot spoilers.) More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Clear Science

It was really after his move to Wellington, to Victoria University, that it became apparent that Sir Paul Cllaghan was much more than an eminent physicist... More>>

ALSO:

Francis Cook: Weekend SportzMania! All Blacks! Netball!

Sports were on all weekend. I normally don’t write about sports but with Richie McCaw tipped to be the next Prime Minister, and Colin Craig arguing sports are almost as important as politics, I thought “what better time to start!” More>>

ALSO:

Beervana: Aussie Pav Beer Declared Taste Of NZ

In a surprising upset, an Australian beer modelled on the pavlova, created by Brisbane brewery Newstead Brewing, the 250 Beers blog and Scratch Bar, has been announced the winner at the Beervana craft beer festival ‘Flag Brew’ competition, which challenged media and brewing teams to capture the distinctive taste of New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news