News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Health experts convene to discuss healthcare issues in NZ

Health experts convene to discuss key healthcare issues facing NZ

Health experts from The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP) will convene in Auckland tomorrow to discuss critical healthcare issues facing New Zealand and Australia and share the latest advances in medical research and internal medicine.

Dr Geoffrey Robinson, Chief Medical Officer, Capital and Coast District Health Board and former RACP NZ President, will review New Zealand’s recent alcohol law reforms. Dr Robinson will discuss NZ Parliament’s lost opportunity for more extensive reforms despite apparent public opinion on readiness to change alcohol control strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm.

“Although the Alcohol Reform Bill adopted two-thirds of the Law Commission’s recommendations, including trading hours and outlet density, it disappointingly rejected many of the important recommendations including a 50% increase in excise tax rates and a minimum purchase age of 20,” Dr Robinson said.

“The influence of the liquor industry remains powerful and alcohol reform in New Zealand remains unfinished business.”

Associate Professor Richard King from Australia will give the keynote oration and discuss the international groundswell to disinvest in health technology that delivers no or low health gain for their cost. Disinvestment activity is underway at all levels of the New Zealand health system.

“Over the past decade there has been an increase in health technology spending estimated to be 25 per cent of the increase in health costs, which cannot continued to be funded,” Associate Professor King said.

“This talk will discuss the health profession’s role in the safe, effective and affordable introduction of health technology and clinical procedures.”

Other highlights on Day One include:
• Gambling addiction and the overlap between gambling and substance use disorders. ‘Disordered gambling’ was included as a new disorder in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM5), and described as a behavioural addiction, when previously it was an impulse control disorder.
• The occupational health of police, teachers, fire-fighters and ambulance workers after the Christchurch earthquake.
• Recent research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and how it remains ‘hidden from view’ due to many factors including the failure of health professionals to identify pregnancies at risk and children requiring assessment. Crucial to FASD prevention is an understanding of why women drink during pregnancy and the need to change attitudes to alcohol use in pregnancy.
• Update on gout treatments and strategies to improve health outcomes. Pacific people in Aotearoa New Zealand have the highest rates of gout worldwide.
• Lung cancer screening and the emerging evidence about using low dose CT scanning for screening.

About The Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP)
The RACP trains, educates and advocates on behalf of more than 14,800 physicians – often referred to as medical specialists – and over 6,000 trainees, across Australia and New Zealand. The College represents more than 32 medical specialties including paediatrics & child health, cardiology, respiratory medicine, neurology, oncology and public health medicine, occupational & environmental medicine, palliative medicine, sexual health medicine, rehabilitation medicine and addiction medicine. Beyond the drive for medical excellence, the RACP is committed to developing health and social policies which bring vital improvements to the wellbeing of patients. www.racp.edu.au

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news