News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Have Kiwis given up the tooth decay fight?

25 May 2014

Have Kiwis given up the tooth decay fight?

New Zealanders are self-conscious about their teeth yet feel powerless to prevent tooth decay. That’s according to new consumer research that shows more than half of New Zealanders believe tooth decay is inevitable. 42% don’t even know the major cause of tooth decay.

The findings are surprising given New Zealand’s well documented problems with tooth decay and cavities. The most recent Ministry of Health Oral Health Survey (2010) found that 51% of children and 77% of the adult population has cavities.

Cavities also account for approximately 76% of all hospital admissions for dental disease in New Zealand and every year nearly 270,000 people have a tooth removed.

The Horizon research of more than 1,200 adults provides unique insights into Kiwis’ attitudes on dental care and how they look after their teeth. It found that:

• 52% believe New Zealanders have good or extremely good oral care.
• 53% believe that tooth decay is inevitable.
• 63% feel self-conscious about their teeth.
• 72% wish they’d taken better care of their teeth.

Of those that said they knew the major cause for tooth decay, 52% attributed it to consuming sugary foods and beverages while 29% blamed poor cleaning or dental hygiene practices. Just over 8% of respondents knew that tooth decay is caused by sugar acids in the mouth weakening tooth enamel.

In terms of what methods Kiwis felt were effective for fighting tooth decay, the research found:

• 97% of respondents said brushing teeth twice a day was effective, ahead of reducing sugary foods and drinks (87%) and flossing once a day (78%).
• Older people aged over 65 are most likely to believe that eating apples reduces tooth decay.
• Younger people under 35 years of age are least likely to believe that consuming less sugar reduces tooth decay.

Colgate Scientific Affairs Manager, Dr Rebecca Schipper, said the consumer research confirmed that New Zealanders needed to think more about what causes tooth decay and how to prevent it.

“We’re surprised that nearly half of the population doesn’t know that sugar is a major contributor to tooth decay. It is so prevalent in our modern diet with all of the processed foods and fizzy drinks. Perhaps that’s why so many feel it’s inevitable?”

“Sugar in the mouth provides an environment for plaque bacteria to thrive and the sugar acids they produce is what causes tooth decay. The fact is tooth decay is almost entirely preventable. It means combating the build-up of sugar acid on tooth enamel through reducing consumption of sugary foods and drinks and proper dental hygiene.” she said.

Dr Schipper said, with daily sugar consumption rising 46% globally in the past 30 years, Colgate was committed to developing new technologies to directly combat tooth decay.

The latest technology is a breakthrough toothpaste - Colgate Maximum Cavity Protection plus Sugar Acid Neutraliser™. The new toothpaste, the only one of its kind in the world, reduces early decay by half (after six months’ use) by neutralising sugar acids in the mouth before they can weaken tooth enamel.[1] Its development was the result of eight years of research involving over 14,000 people.

“Over the years, I’ve seen hundreds of patients requiring immediate and urgent treatment for decay, from fillings to hospital treatment.”

“As a profession, I believe we really need to continue our efforts to educate New Zealanders and encourage good oral health care. There is no reason for people to give up the fight on tooth decay. It’s about changing our oral hygiene habits and dietary patterns, especially the regular consumption of sugary foods and drinks,” Dr Schipper said.

[1] Do not use in children six years of age or less. For children aged 6 years and younger, Colgate recommends specially formulated Colgate children’s toothpaste

About Colgate-Palmolive
Colgate-Palmolive New Zealand is a wholly owned subsidiary of the New York listed Colgate-Palmolive Company. It is a leading consumer products company specialising in oral health care, personal care, household care, fabric care and pet nutrition. Colgate-Palmolive’s products are sold in over 200 countries and include internationally recognised brands such as Colgate, Palmolive, Ajax Spray n’ Wipe, Cold Power and Fab.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Architecture:
Ian Athfield Dies In Wellington

New Zealand Institute of Architects: It is with great sadness that we inform Members that Sir Ian Athfield, one of New Zealand's finest architects, has passed away in Wellington. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington Production: New-Look Tracy Brothers Are F.A.B.

ITV and New Zealand’s Pukeko Pictures today released an exclusive preview of the new-look Tracy brothers from this year’s hotly anticipated new series, Thunderbirds Are Go. More>>

ALSO:

Cardinal Numbers:
Pope Francis Names Archbishop From NZ Among New Cardinals

Announcing a list of bishops to be made Cardinals in February Pope Francis named Archbishop John Dew, Archbishop of Wellington, overnight from Rome. On hearing the news of the announcement, Archbishop John Dew said "This news is recognition of the Catholic Church in Aotearoa New Zealand, and the contribution it makes to the global Catholic family." More>>

ALSO:

Nomenclature: Charlotte And Oliver Top Baby Names For 2014

Charlotte and Oliver were the most popular names for newborn girls and boys in 2014... The top 100 girls’ and boys’ names make up a small proportion of the more than 12,000 unique first names registered for children born this year, says Jeff Montgomery, Registrar-General of Births, Deaths and Marriage. More>>

Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news