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Newly-merged Lifeline uses Rebrand to Signal Change

Newly-merged Lifeline uses Rebrand to Signal Change

Lifeline New Zealand rebrands to Lifeline Aotearoa, merging eight local Centres with new image and logo.

Lifeline, best known throughout New Zealand for its 24/7 crisis helpline and suicide prevention training, is completing a period of change by launching a new brand image and logo today.

Over the last eighteen months Lifeline has been working to merge its eight, independent regional centres as a single incorporated society, allowing the organisation to focus more effectively on answering the ever-growing number of calls to its free helpline service.

“We are really excited to be launching a fresh, modern and innovative brand image that, we feel, represents us as an organisation and will take us forward over the coming decade, while recognising and acknowledging Lifeline’s 50 year history in New Zealand,” says Jo Denvir, Chief Executive of Lifeline.

The rebrand also marks a change of name for Lifeline New Zealand, which will now be known as Lifeline Aotearoa. “The change of our name to Lifeline Aotearoa represents our ongoing commitment to multiculturalism, recognising our growing relationship with Maori and the pride we have as an organisation to be part of such a diverse community” says Ms Denvir.

Lifeline was delighted when branding and advertising agency REPUBLIK agreed to support the organisation by developing their new brand image pro-bono.

“We, like many other New Zealanders, were aware of Lifeline so the opportunity to work with them to develop a brand that represented their journey, the diverse communities they work with and the many ways they contribute to our society was something we were delighted to support,” says Agency Director, Paul McNamara.

“Our creative team spent a lot of time considering Lifeline’s brief. While the image, at first glance, represents the ‘L’ of Lifeline, the 3 circles that join to form the ‘L’ represent the many groups within the organisation, and the communities they work with. The ‘L’ shape reaches out to the single circle to welcome it and we can see that the lone circle fits well into the corner of the ‘L’ shape, emphasising that individuality can be retained while being embraced by the whole.“

Says Ms Denvir, “For us, we also liked that the circles represented the different Lifeline Centres, which have come together to form a stronger, more effective organisation focused on our callers and service users. We view it as a very powerful and representative image.”

The new image will be phased in over the coming months around Lifeline’s eight centres.


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