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Corbel Construction - Child Haematology Oncology Centre

Corbel Construction wins contract to build new Child Haematology Oncology Centre

Christchurch-based construction company Corbel Construction (Corbel) has been appointed by the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to build the new Child Haematology Oncology Centre (CHOC) at Christchurch Hospital.

The new CHOC, which will be completed later this year, replaces an existing facility in the hospital’s Riverside Building with a much expanded Child Cancer unit within the hospital’s Clinical Services Building.

Corbel Construction’s managing director Craig Jones said this is one of the more significant projects undertaken by the company’s commercial division to date.

“It is also consistent with our goal of undertaking larger commercial construction projects with a particular focus on the health and education sectors, alongside the larger programmes of residential work such as the Southern Response programme,” Craig Jones said.

“Winning the tender to construct the new CHOC is both rewarding and challenging. The project will provide a much improved facility for the delivery of child haematology and oncology care, and we have undertaken to ensure that the build is completed in time for the CHOC to be commissioned and operational before the end of this calendar year.”

All services within the CHOC are expanding with inpatient capacity increasing from seven to 11 bedrooms (all single ensuite) and the treatment area increasing to two treatment rooms, an isolation room and an assessment room. The outpatient area is also expanding with a specific area for adolescent patients to sit while receiving treatment and a children’s play area. Other spaces being increased in size to cope with the demand of the expanded unit are the staff station, clinical offices and interview rooms. The entire centre will be positively pressurised to ensure the air flow comes only from the filtered supply that will be installed as part of the air conditioning system.

The build cost for the new CHOC is expected to be about $5 million. It will remain in place until until a permanent Child Haematology Oncology Centre is built, as part of the Christchurch Hospital redevelopment of acute services. The current CHOC project has been designed to accommodate other clinical services in the future.

In addition to providing a new facility, the Canterbury DHB is taking the opportunity to carry out extensive structural works to increase the seismic capacity of the four-level Clinical Services Building. Additional reinforced concrete walls and structural tensioning will be installed in the basement and lower ground floor by Corbel Construction as part of the CHOC project. This will be the first of a number of stages that will result in the building being 100 percent of the New Building Standard (NBS).

About Corbel Construction
Established in 2000, Christchurch-based Corbel Construction employs over 85 fulltime permanent staff across three divisions: Commercial Construction, Residential Building and Joinery Manufacturing.

A private company, Corbel is owned and operated by its founders Craig Jones and Mark Wells.

The company has grown significantly, averaging 25% growth per annum over the past six years, with targeted annual revenue of $30 million for this financial year.

Corbel therefore has the skills, experience and resources to allow it to undertake a number of projects concurrently.

The Residential division has typically focused on the mid-to-upper end of the residential housing market with the Commercial division specialising in small-to-medium sized commercial projects. More recently, Corbel has recruited a number of talented people within the industry and is now able to undertake larger commercial projects and larger programmes of residential work.

For further information, see: www.corbel.co.nz

“Best People, Best Practice, Best Outcome”

ENDS

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