News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Breaking the silence about violence in mental health

Breaking the silence about violence in mental health

The impact of violence on mental health nurses is revealed through the experiences of a group of nurses in an article in the June issue of the New Zealand Nurses Organisation’s (NZNO) magazine, Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand, published this week (available here).

The nurses believe there is a culture of silence about violence in mental health. They agreed to speak about their experiences to their professional nursing magazine - to break that silence and to shine light on the problem.

In the article “Assaults leave nurses fearful”, the nurses describe being punched, kicked, stabbed, burnt, choked and verbally abused and threatened. Nurses who felt competent and confident before they were assaulted became fearful and struggled to cope with the physical and psychological effects of the attacks. Their families were also deeply affected. The article is written by an experienced mental health nurse from Christchurch.

Figures gained from district health boards (DHBs) via the Official Information Act show reported assaults by mental health patients on staff more than doubled between 2010 and 2012.

According to the article, mental health is more prone to violence than other parts of the health sector, because of the nature of some kinds of mental illness which can lead to aggressive, irrational behaviour. This can be exacerbated by drug and alcohol use, and other social factors. Working conditions in mental health services can also affect the risk of violence. Nurses are most vulnerable to attacks from patients because they spend the most time with patients and provide most of the front-line care.

Mental health nursing directors told Kai Tiaki Nursing New Zealand DHBs worked hard to provide safe working environments for their nurses, through ensuring staff numbers and skills were suitable. Staff are also taught how to de-escalate violent situations and how to break away from a patient’s hold.

NZNO provides industrial and professional support to more than half the country’s mental health nurses.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Howard Davis: Get It On, Bang A Gong, Pt I

Several readers have recently inquired about the significance of the image that accompanies my by-line. While the man-bun is long gone, I still incorporate the sound of the gong in my Kundalini Yoga classes. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news