News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Motor Neurone Disease Awareness Day

MEDIA RELEASE 20 June, 2014
Motor Neurone Disease Awareness Day - fieldworkers provide advocacy and support
Each year around 100 New Zealanders are diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease, a fatal degenerative illness that slowly robs people of the ability to carry-out simple, everyday tasks.

Tomorrow, June 21, is Global Motor Neurone Disease Awareness Day and the MND Association of New Zealand is highlighting the work of its free nationwide fieldwork service, which is available to everyone with MND as they battle this disease for which there is no cure.

“Every day we’re inspired by the lives led by people living in New Zealand with Motor Neurone Disease,” says MND Association NZ National Manager Grant Diggle. “Our fieldworkers support people and their families living with MND by providing advocacy and support.”

People with Motor Neurone Disease (MND) slowly lose the ability to move, speak and swallow as the nerve cells, or neurones, which control these functions degenerate and die.

Living with MND is incredibly challenging, says South Island fieldworker Kate Moulson who has been a fieldworker with the association for nearly 10 years. “If I can make their journey easier and less stressful, it’s very rewarding.”

Kate is one of seven fieldworkers, employed by the Association, who provide the service which is available free to the approximately 300 people in New Zealand with MND.

Key to the fieldworker’s role is helping people with MND and their families navigate the health system, including accessing available support. “Quite often people that get MND are fit healthy, and have very little medical history. A lot of my focus is on making sure people are linked into the right services at the right time.”

Worldwide MND associations are marking today by joining together for the online One Global Team, One Goal campaign. Athletes from sporting codes, including rugby, soccer, tennis and swimming, have been invited to show their support using hashtag #GlobalTeam.

Mr Diggle says there is great support from sports people of all levels and abilities in New Zealand. “Today the Association is proud to announce another great example of a New Zealander whose experience of MND has led them to do something quite extraordinary.”

Queenstown’s Carey Vivian will embark on a 4000km off road charity bike ride Race Against Time in February. The event is in recognition of doing everything before it’s too late, says Carey. “That’s the message my Dad received when he was told he had MND two years ago.”

The aim of the challenge is to also promote awareness of MND. The six-week event will see Carey criss-cross the country several times as he travels from Cape Reinga to Bluff. “I researched all I could and decided that I needed to do something tangible for MND NZ, an organisation that relies on a very small pool of funds in order to help those suffering around the country”.


To show your support you can donate via Fundraise Online or visit Carey Vivian’s Race Against Time. Funds raised will help the Association provide practical day-to-day support to New Zealander’s living with MND through its fieldwork service. You can also join us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/mndanz
• Global Awareness Day is Saturday 21 June 2014. Every year since 1997, the International Alliance has celebrated 21 June as the global day of recognition for MND or ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the name given to the disease in the United States) – which affects people in every country across the globe.
• 21 June is a solstice – a turning point – and each year the MND community undertake a range of activities to express their hope that this will be another turning point in the search for cause, treatment and cure of this most challenging disease.
Opportunities for media interviews
• As part of this year’s event we are offering media an opportunity to talk with a local MND Association of New Zealand fieldworker. Watch our video clip of South Island fieldworker Kate Moulson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uz0l5Ljn2zA
• Interviews with Carey Vivian, carrying out Race Against Time, can also be arranged.
• Ground-breaking research is also taking place at Auckland University’s Centre for Brain Research. Dr Emma Scotter, who has recently arrived from King’s College in London, will lead research into around 4000 drugs to see if any of the compounds can influence, or change, the development of Motor Neurone Disease in the brain.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Film Awards: The Dark Horse Scores Big

An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach Genesis Potini, made all the right moves to take out top honours along with five other awards at the Rialto Channel New Zealand Film Awards - nicknamed The Moas. More>>

ALSO:

Theatre: Ralph McCubbin Howell Wins 2014 Bruce Mason Award

The Bruce Mason Playwriting Award was presented to Ralph McCubbin Howell at the Playmarket Accolades in Wellington on 23 November 2014. More>>

ALSO:

One Good Tern: Fairy Tern Crowned NZ Seabird Of The Year

The fairy tern and the Fiji petrel traded the lead in the poll several times. But a late surge saw it come out on top with 1882 votes. The Fiji petrel won 1801 votes, and 563 people voted for the little blue penguin. More>>

Music Awards: Lorde Reigns Supreme

Following a hugely successful year locally and internationally, Lorde has done it again taking out no less than six Tuis at the 49th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news