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Science and Sensibility meet in Queenstown Conference

Science and Sensibility meet in Queenstown Conference

19 June 2014

July 25 marks the beginning of ‘Science to Sensibility’, a two-day conference in Queenstown organised by the New Zealand Resuscitation Council.

Dr Richard Aickin, conference convener and Chair of the New Zealand Resuscitation Council says, “‘Science to Sensibility’ is Australasia’s foremost scientific meeting on resuscitation this year.” With 250 delegates, it is also the New Zealand Resuscitation Council’s biggest conference since its beginnings nearly 20 years ago.

International keynote speakers have been invited to share their expertise and perspectives. Gavin Perkins, Professor of Critical Care Medicine at the University of Warwick, specialises in mechanical CPR and CPR feedback devices. Dr Allan de Caen, from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, specialises in paediatrics. Other high-profile speakers from New Zealand and Australia will also be presenting.

Topics of resuscitation science, education, and cardiac arrest registry data from New Zealand and Australia will feature prominently. While much of the discourse will focus on resuscitation where advanced care is available, the fact that most resuscitation events occur outside the hospital – including in extreme environments – has not been lost.

“One only has to look around Queenstown to see that many rescuers will face challenges not experienced in hospital environments,” says Dr Aickin. “It’s important not to lose sight of this, and in our conference we look forward to Search and Rescue sharing some examples from the Queenstown Lakes region.”

While the conference will draw an audience of resuscitation practitioners and health professionals, there are implications for any would-be rescuer. Translating scientific evidence into resuscitation guidelines is the role of the New Zealand Resuscitation Council, as Dr Aickin explains: “As New Zealand’s guideline and standard-setting body for resuscitation, it’s our job to ensure that all New Zealanders have access to resuscitation that’s informed by and reflective of best practice. This conference is a great opportunity to see how international developments might be applied to our country’s health system for the benefit of all New Zealanders.”

For more about 'Science to Sensibility' see http://nzrc2014.co.nz.


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