News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search


High Rate of STIs Outcome of ‘Safe Sex’ Myth


26 June 2014

High Rate of STIs Outcome of ‘Safe Sex’ Myth

Family First NZ says that "staggeringly high" rates of chlamydia reported among New Zealand teenage girls is proof that young people are being left misinformed and with a false sense of security. It also points to the failure of the free Emergency Contraception Pill schemes to young people and the ‘use a condom – safe sex’ myth. New Zealand's rate of chlamydia is much higher than Australia's (633 compared to 355 per 100,000 of population).

“Research has consistently shown that increased access to emergency contraception does not result in lower pregnancy rates among adolescents and young adults, but can be associated with an increased incidence of sexual activity and sexually transmitted infections,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“A review last year by US psychiatrist Dr Miriam Grossman of sex education resources pushed by groups such as the Family Planning Association and Rainbow Youth found that they were not accurate, comprehensive, or up-to-date. The report said ‘Sex is seen as risky only when it’s ‘unprotected’. The efficacy of condoms is overstated, in some cases vastly so. The vulnerability of the immature cervix and the hazards of anal intercourse are omitted. Chlamydia is incorrectly described as ‘easily cured’. Young people are led to believe that sex is easily divorced from emotional attachment. Worst of all, critical life and death information is distorted or ignored’.”

A 2012 US study found increased access to emergency contraception increases the rates of sexually transmitted diseases, risk taking and a false sense of security, while doing nothing to reduce the number of abortions. The study found that more widespread use of the morning-after pill “led to a statistically significant increase in STD rates (gonorrhoea rates), both overall and for females.”

A study in the Journal of Health Economics in January 2011, conducted in the United Kingdom, which found that widespread access to emergency contraception did nothing to reduce pregnancy but increased STD rates by 12%.

There are also concerns that the morning-after pill could reduce the fertility of teenage girls later in life, according to a report by the Scottish Council of Human Bioethics. Glasgow GP Anne Williams said: 'We'd be worried about hormonal disturbances which could affect the development of young girls and their future fertility. It could be like putting the wrong grade of oil into a car - it might grind to a halt.' But no studies have been carried out on its effect on young girls.

“Teen girls deserve to be informed of the serious consequences of early sexual activity including the impact on emotional and mental welfare and academic performance, rather than given a false sense of security and being encouraged to take risks by adults who should know better,” says Mr McCoskrie.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news