News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


School-Based Health Service providing better access to care

School-Based Health Service providing better access to care

8 July 2014

The recent expansion of the School-Based Health Service (SBHS) to decile three secondary schools is further reducing barriers that prevent students from accessing healthcare services.

Under the service, nurses who have experience working with young people, are working within decile 1-3 schools to offer personal health services that include assessment, treatment and referral options on-site. The presence of a nurse within the school makes access to healthcare much easier for students.

One of the decile three schools that has been part of the service’s expansion is Hato Paora College, on the outskirts of Feilding. Registered Nurse Dale Phillips-Tuivaga operates the service at the college, where she deals with the usual bumps and scrapes of school life, but also takes a holistic approach to the health of the students.

She said: “While we have the normal sports injuries, and illnesses that come along with life at a boarding school, there is also a lot more to the care. Being available to provide advice on a number of social and emotional issues is also an important function of the job.”

Conducting a HEADSS assessment for all year nine students is another role that the SBHS provides. This assessment encompasses the student’s home life, as well as physical, social and developmental health. A holistic assessment such as this allows nurses to gain a wider view of the students’ needs.

For Dale, health promotion is another beneficial part of her role. A recent example was the organising of a team of nurses to visit the school to provide influenza vaccinations.

“In any school environment, diseases can spread easily, and it is important that we as nurses inform the students of health. Being within the schools gives us an ability to provide these sorts of health promotion messages directly to the students.

“To me, we just need to make sure that we are doing all we can to look after the adolescents in our care.”

MDHB Portfolio Manager, Child and Youth Health Barb Bradnock is pleased with the results of the rollout of the School Based Health Services.

“The scheme has been well received by pupils and the wider school community. The expansion to include decile three schools means that we are able to further reduce the obstacles that may prevent young people in our region from accessing healthcare.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news