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Child Health Information Programme: no child left behind

8 July 2014

National Child Health Information Programme aims to ensure no child is left behind

A new Midlands Health Network regional programme to prevent children getting lost in the health system and missing out on important health services has been welcomed by Health Minister Tony Ryall.

The National Child Health Information Programme (NCHIP) led by Midlands Health Network as part of the Better, Sooner, More Convenient Business Case has contracted New Zealand-owned global health software company Orion Health and BPac with the overall aim to ensure that no child falls between the cracks of the health system.

After a review of child health services by a wide range of child health experts under the business case, it was identified that the biggest game changer for children needed to focus on creating greater transparency between providers around children to ensure better outcomes.

“With NCHIP doctors and other health providers will be able to use their patient management system systems or log on to a password-protected website to see a shared view of a child’s progress towards the 29 health milestones such as immunisations, well child checks, hearing and vision checks, and B4school checks,” says Mr Ryall.

“They will also be able to see which other providers are delivering these health services to a particular child. If they’re unable to contact or find a child who is due for a health check, they can phone or send a secure message to a coordination service that will be able to launch a wider search for that child.

“This important new programme is expected to result in more Waikato children being enrolled with GPs, well child-tamariki ora providers and oral health services, more children having their immunisations and health checks in a timely manner, and more children receiving treatment for health problems when they need it. It should also help to locate vulnerable children who might otherwise have dropped off the radar.”

Midlands Health Network, the Ministry of Health, the National Health IT Board and four district health boards – Lakes, Tairawhiti, Taranaki and Waikato – joined forces to develop the programme, which will track children’s health milestones from birth until the age of six.

The pilot programme will run in the Waikato region from August 2014 to March 2015, when an evaluation will identify areas for improvement ahead of roll out to the Lakes, Tairawhiti and Taranaki DHB areas in the Midland region. It will then be available for national roll out.

John Macaskill-Smith, CEO of Midlands Health Network is excited to see NCHIP joining the suit of new approaches to providing community and primary care services. “NCHIP is another important component to supporting the development of a primary health care home. People live in the community and access the majority of their health care outside of hospitals and other large health institutions, so it’s important to see investment and broader development of services closer to home.”

Midlands Health Network has developed and launched a new model of care for general practices and other community-based providers that is seeing patients getting better, quicker and more effective access to care.

Orion Health CEO Ian McCrae says the NCHIP is one of a series of ground-breaking programmes his company is working on with New Zealand District Health Boards.

Others include:
• Strategic partnership and global reference site with world renowned leader in integrated health systems, Canterbury District Health Board
• A just announced partnership with Waitemata DHB to improve health outcomes and develop new e-health initiatives;
• The deployment of a Clinical Information System across the six Central Region DHBs - Hawke’s Bay, Wanganui, MidCentral, Wairarapa, Hutt Valley and Capital & Coast;
• A contract with the South Island Health Alliance to improve information services and efficiencies for the five South Island DHBs – Nelson Marlborough, West Coast, Canterbury, South Canterbury and Southern;
• A longstanding partnership with Counties Manukau DHB Orion Health to build IT solutions to achieve CMDHB’s strategy for cost-effective care throughout its community.

About Midlands Health Network
Midlands Health Network is a primary health care innovator and development company. Midlands Health Network supports the sustainability and further development of leading edge primary health care services across the middle part of the north Island of New Zealand for around 500,000 patients.

Midlands Health Network ensures health providers and clinicians have the tools they need to deliver services that create the best health outcomes for their patients.

Midlands Health Network is recognised nationally and internationally as a leader in developing new models of care within the primary and community space.

Midlands Health Network is owned by Pinnacle Incorporated, a network of general practitioners and health professionals. Midlands Health Network is a not-for-profit primary health care management company with offices in Hamilton, New Plymouth, Gisborne and Taupo.

For more information, visit www.midlandshn.health.nz.

About Orion Health
Orion Health is a global leader in providing world-class healthcare integration software and clinical workflow solutions to organisations. With over 20 years’ experience in developing healthcare solutions, Orion Health has partnered with over 1,000 customers across 20 countries and implemented health information systems for populations of more than 50 million people.

Orion Health software is designed for hospitals and health systems that are looking for smarter, more efficient integration and workflow solutions. Our designers and engineers work alongside clinicians to develop elegant and intuitive products that are designed for ease of use.This clinical know-how ensures swift adoption and minimal disruption, allowing clinicians to focus on patients.

In the United States Orion Health HIE (Health Information Exchange) provides the technology backbone for state and regional HIEs across the country. Orion Health Rhapsody Integration Engine is used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and nearly every state and local health department for public health reporting. In the United Kingdom and Europe it provides support for NHS (National Health Service) providers and private hospitals and is experiencing rapid growth throughout Asia-Pacific.

For more information, visit www.orionhealth.com. Connect with us on Twitter and LinkedIn.

ENDS

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