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Former Starship CEO now heading Waitemata charitable trust

CEO Andrew Young Well Foundation

Former Starship CEO now heading Waitemata charitable trust

The new Well Foundation charity can claim first success with the news it has snagged fundraising maestro Andrew Young as its inaugural CEO.

Andrew will be best known to many New Zealanders through his role as CEO of Starship Foundation, which is one of the country’s highest profile charities.

He is a legend in fundraising circles after sending Starship’s annual revenue rocketing during his combined 12 years there.

He now brings his energy and management skills to the Well Foundation, which will work alongside Waitemata DHB to support innovative projects that deliver on its promise of best care for all.

Andrew says part of the attraction of his new role was the challenge of helping to build the Well Foundation from the ground up.

“The opportunities at the Well Foundation are to instill the loyalty and community love of Waitemata people towards their local health services, so opportunities are different but nevertheless exciting and demanding,“ he says.

Another difference for Andrew is moving from a child focus to a foundation that supports care across all ages.

“One of the joys for me will be enticing the community to support us in child--focused projects, as well as projects that support teens, adults and the older population,” he says.

Andrew was shoulder--tapped to head the new Well Foundation after a stint working as Les Mills International’s Global Marketing Director.

“To be approached personally by Waitemata DHB CEO Dr Dale Bramley and Chair Dr Lester Levy to head up a new fundraising team and brand is both challenging and exciting,” he says.


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