News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


English car smoking ban a model for New Zealand

English car smoking ban a model for New Zealand

Tala Pasifika and Smokefree Coalition media release, 16 July 2014

Tala Pasifika has welcomed the launch of a consultation bringing a ban on smoking in cars carrying children a step closer in England, saying its information will usher the measure along in New Zealand.

Tala’s General Manager Edward Cowley said children who are passengers in cars where someone is smoking are exposed to dangerous levels of toxic fumes. He hopes England’s ministers are encouraged by the consultation to bring in the regulation banning smoke in vehicles where children under the age of 18 are present.

The consultation on the initiative launched today and will run for six weeks.

"Second-hand smoke is a real and substantial threat to child health," Cowley says.

"In 2012, almost a quarter of our Year 10 students here in New Zealand reported being exposed to second-hand smoke in private vehicles, including the family car. But there is also a much higher proportion of Maori and Pacific students who are exposed, compared with students of other ethnicities.”

England’s consultation seeks views on draft regulations before they are made. The aims of the regulations on smoking in private vehicles carrying children would be to: protect children from the health harms associated with exposure to second-hand smoke in private vehicles; encourage action by smokers to protect children from second-hand smoke; and, in time, lead to a reduction in health conditions in children caused by exposure to second-hand smoke.

In February, English MPs voted in favour of legislation that could see the move brought forward under the Children and Families Act.

"Cars are small tin boxes where concentrations of tobacco smoke can reach dangerous levels very quickly," said Deborah Arnott, Chief Executive of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in England.

"As David Cameron himself has said, ‘the time has come for it to be illegal to make children breathe in these toxic fumes. Laws stopping smoking in cars with children are popular with the public, with parliament and with children and we urge the Government to bring them into force before the next election’."

Cowley says the same public popularity of the measure is true for New Zealand.

“A UMR poll conducted recently by ASH NZ found that 91 percent of people agree smoking should be banned in cars carrying children younger than 18 years of age”.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news