News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Network applauds extra rural medical student allocation

July 17, 2014

Network applauds extra rural medical student allocation

The announcement by Health Minister Tony Ryall of an additional 34 medical places for students next year at the country’s two medical schools, 17 of which will be earmarked for rural students is extremely encouraging, says New Zealand Rural General Practice Network deputy chairperson Sharon Hansen.

Rural New Zealand and its communities face an ongoing challenge to train, recruit and retain doctors. The fact that these extra medical training places are targeted at those wanting to work in rural New Zealand goes to the very core of the problem, says Ms Hansen.

Research suggests that students who come from and train in rural communities are more likely to return to work in rural areas, so the latest announcement is certainly pleasing.

“However, it is a long way from medical school to having a general practitioner working in the rural sector, and support will be required beyond medical school.

“It is equally important that their exposure to rural based education is repeated throughout their training years, especially in multidisciplinary training sites alongside rural nursing and allied health students.”

While the Network applauds the additional training places it looks forward to more similar initiatives to bolster the rural medical workforce into the future, says Ms Hansen.

“The Network and the rural health sector has for many years been acutely concerned about the rapidly ageing GP population in rural, the inability to train, recruit and retain New Zealand doctors to the rural sector and the reliance on International Medical Graduates to fill the void.

“We are still some way off future-proofing the health and well-being of rural New Zealand, its communities and people in this respect,” says Ms Hansen.

Half of the positions will be offered to rural students through the Regional and Rural Admissions Scheme at the University of Auckland and the Rural Sub Category at the University of Otago. The other 17 places will be offered to students through the Universities’ other application routes.

Auckland University will increase the number of students on its Regional and Rural Admissions Scheme from 40 to 52 from 2015. Meanwhile, Otago University has increased its number from 50 to 55 from the same year.

Since 2009 this government has now funded 170 extra medical school places. The funding of these additional medical places is part of the $18 million the government made available for post-graduate education and training of doctors in this year’s Budget. Latest Ministry of Health data from March 2014 showed 7,518 doctors and 21,598 nurses are employed by district health boards – over 1,500 more doctors and 3,200 more nurses compared to 2008.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news