News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Resuscitation – “Everybody can help”

Resuscitation – “Everybody can help”

21 July 2014


International resuscitation experts will soon arrive in Queenstown for ‘Science to Sensibility’, a scientific meeting hosted by the New Zealand Resuscitation Council.

The conference, on 25 and 26 July, will focus on the latest evidence from resuscitation science and research. But Dr Richard Aickin, Conference Convener and Chair of the New Zealand Resuscitation Council, is clear that resuscitation is “important for everybody.”

“Successful resuscitation starts with science,” says Dr Aickin. “There is plenty of evidence for what works, and what doesn’t, in resuscitation. The New Zealand Resuscitation Council provides guidelines to help rescuers focus on what will make a difference to help people who have collapsed. Survival depends on bystanders taking immediate action.”

Queenstown Lakes Mayor Vanessa van Uden will open the conference, and echoes Dr Aickin’s sentiments that resuscitation is applicable to all. Mayor van Uden says, “Queenstown is an ideal location to discuss resuscitation. Being here reminds us that New Zealanders love getting active outdoors, but that resuscitation events can and do occur anywhere – including while enjoying our mountains, lakes, and wilderness areas.”

Many people are aware of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for treating cardiac arrest, which affects about 2,000 New Zealanders ever year. CPR – the cycle of chest compressions and rescue breathing – is effective to buy time until expert help arrives. “Any attempt at resuscitation is better than no attempt,” says Dr Aickin.

“Being trained in resuscitation is always desirable,” says Dr Aickin, yet rescuers without training are still capable of providing life-saving treatment for patients in need. “Everybody can help. It can be as simple as pushing hard and fast on the center of the chest, and don’t stop until help arrives. Automatic defibrillators (AEDs) are available in many places. These life saving devices are extremely safe and will guide an untrained person to save a life.”

For more about ‘Science to Sensibility’ see http://nzrc2014.co.nz. To learn more about the New Zealand Resuscitation Council see www.nzrc.org.nz.


END


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Memorabilia: Te Papa Buys Peter Snell Singlet

Te Papa has purchased the singlet worn by Peter Snell at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics at an auction this morning at Cordy’s auction house in Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Women At The Centre

In the first chapter of her epic History of New Zealand Women, Barbara Brookes places a version of the Māori creation story alongside that of the Pākehā colonists, setting the scene for how each society saw women. The contrast is startling. More>>

In Auckland Art Gallery: A Tour Of Duty

I had already started my journey through the exhibited collections when an audio announcement about a guided tour to embark shortly from the foyer was made, I decided to join in. Why not? More>>

Art: ‘Holiday’ Wins IHC Art Awards

An intricate embroidered cushion by Wellington artist Jo-Anne Tapiki has won the 2016 IHC Art Awards and $5000. Jo-Anne started working from IHC’s Arts on High studio in Lower Hutt 18 months ago and this is the first time she has entered the competition. More>>

‘Quasi’: Christchurch Art Gallery Reveals Rooftop Sculpture

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in Christchurch Art Gallery's latest outdoor installation. More>>

Obituary: Last 28th Maori Battalion A Company Veteran Dies

Charlie Petera, the final surviving member of A-Company of the 28th Maori Battalion has died at his home in Ngataki, Northland last night surrounded by his whanau. He was 91 years old. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news