News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Lasting impact of pre-birth environment on future health

23 July 2014

Persistent echoes of early life

Lecture highlights the lasting impact of the pre-birth environment on future health.

The Liggins Institute’s newest professor, paediatrician Paul Hofman will present his Inaugural Lecture “Persistent echoes of early life” at the University of Auckland on Wednesday 30 July at 5pm.

Professor Hofman has been involved in clinical research at the Institute for more than 10 years. During that time he and his colleagues have amassed a considerable body of evidence showing that events that occur even before a child is born continue to influence its health and development as it grows up.

Professor Hofman says there is now growing awareness that early life events have recognised outcomes which affect health in later life, including body composition, metabolism and adult disease risk.

“Events that occur during the time from pre-conception through to late pregnancy have been associated with differing, adverse outcomes dependent on the timing and duration of the events,” he says

The lecture will recount his research team’s early findings from studies in which they followed the development of children who had been born preterm or small for their gestational age. Even before 10 years of age the preterm born children showed signs of insulin resistance – a condition known to be a potential precursor of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease. The story continued as researchers found links between other factors, such as birth order and parental age, which suggest that these too may affect long term growth and metabolic disease risk.

Professor Hofman combines his research at the Liggins Institute with clinical work as a paediatric endocrinologist at Auckland’s Starship Children’s Hospital, treating children with hormone related conditions that affect their growth, development and metabolism. He holds leadership positions in the discipline’s two largest regional societies: Immediate Past-president of the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group and President-elect of the Asia Pacific Paediatric Endocrine Society. He also assists a number of support groups including the Diabetes Youth, Turner Syndrome Society, the Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Society and the Prader Willi Syndrome Society, of which he is a past president.

Liggins Institute Director and long-time colleague Professor Wayne Cutfield will introduce the lecture. “Promotion to professor is the pinnacle of academic achievement and reflects Paul’s international reputation as a world class researcher in the field of metabolism and developmental programming,” said Professor Cutfield.

This research aligns strongly with the Liggins Institute’s vision of “a healthy start for a healthy life” and its aim to improve life-long health through excellent research into the long-term consequences of early life events.

The lecture will be held 5-6pm in lecture theatre 505-007 on the ground floor of the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences building at 85 Park Road, Grafton; opposite Auckland Hospital and the Auckland Domain.

The lecture is open to the public and visitors are welcome to join members of the Institute and University and the medical and science communities for light refreshments in the adjacent Liggins Institute Foyer, from 4.30pm.

Further information is on the Liggins Institute website or telephone 09 923 1966.

The Liggins Institute
The Liggins Institute is a Large-Scale Research Institute of The University of Auckland, NZ. The Institute’s research demonstrates the importance of children having a healthy start to life and the ongoing role of nutrition in promoting and supporting optimal health throughout life.

The multidisciplinary, translational research seeks to understand the biological mechanisms that drive critical processes during development and harness that knowledge in ways that will improve quality of life across communities and generations.

www.liggins.auckland.ac.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news