News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Waikato Surgeon Upset at Surgical Mesh Criticism

Media Release

Date: 25 July 2014

Waikato Surgeon Upset at Surgical Mesh Criticism


A leading Waikato Hospital surgeon says recent publicity about surgical mesh has the potential to detract attention from real clinical issues and undermine public confidence in well-established standards of care.

Dr Rowan French, the clinical director of general surgery at Waikato Hospital, said some of the criticism amounted to “inappropriate generalisation” and “scare-mongering”. Doctors routinely use surgical mesh in the repair of hernias, gynaecological problems and incontinence.

Advocates have called for the Government to launch an independent inquiry into the use of surgical mesh. Dr French said it was important for the public to understand that the uses of mesh were wide and varied.

“Potential complications are related to the technical aspects and placement location of the mesh and almost never the mesh itself. “Reported problems such as erosion of mesh into internal organs and major pelvic pain are related to the use of mesh in the pelvis to treat prolapse and incontinence,” said Dr French.

The actual reported incidence of these complications is rare. “It is vital that this particular use of mesh is distinguished from the (far more common) use of mesh to treat various abdominal wall hernias. “This particular use is not experimental, it is worldwide standard of care.” “Hernia operations using mesh do have a small risk of problems such as chronic nerve pain. and can be associated with the complications of hernia recurrence or chronic nerve pain.

“These complications were in fact more common in the era before the use of mesh. We support informed consent with these surgeries including discussion of real and potential risks.

“The current coverage of surgical mesh in the media is misinforming the public and adversely affecting the consent process.”

www.nzags.co.nz/assets/Uploads/Advocacy-and-consultation/Final-version-mesh-hernia-repair.pdf

ENDS


Background

Rowan French is a gastrointestinal and endocrine surgeon with a strong interest in metabolic surgery, including both under-nutrition and over-nutrition.

He is a member of many general and obesity surgical societies.

His primary interests include the treatment of breast disease and breast cancer, thyroid and parathyroid surgery, gastrointestinal endoscopy and the surgical management of obesity. He is committed to the treatment of patients at both ends of the nutritional scale.

He has trained extensively in these areas around New Zealand. His other interests include surgical nutrition including intravenous nutrition.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news