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Education sessions aim to level the playing field

Prostate cancer education sessions aim to level the playing field

Men urged to increase their knowledge of prostate cancer, and to be prepared to speak up, in order to achieve parity with breast cancer awareness.


The Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand is calling for all men living with advanced prostate cancer, and their families, to learn more about the disease and take an active role in defining their own health outcomes.

“Current treatment options are limited for men who have spread of prostate cancer that has become resistant to hormone treatment,” says Professor Chris Atkinson, Oncologist and Medical Director of the Cancer Society.

“By providing men, and their families with detailed information about metastatic prostate cancer, they will be in a stronger position to make informed choices about their treatments, and the options available to them extend their life or to enhance their quality of life,” added Professor Atkinson.

Graeme Woodside, Chief Executive Officer of the Prostate Cancer Foundation explains that prostate cancer, and particularly end-of-life treatment and care, is a topic that many men shy away from speaking about publically.

“We need to get better at talking about men’s health issues and prostate cancer specifically if we are to ensure men have access to resources and treatment options equal to that available for breast cancer. Only then can we hope to improve options and outcomes for New Zealand men with metastatic prostate cancer,” says Graeme.

In order to provide up to date information about prostate cancer progression, treatment options and pathways of care, a series of education sessions will be held in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch in August (details provided below).

Leading specialists involved in the treatment and care of men with metastatic prostate cancer will present information about the disease, international treatment guidelines as well as the current treatment options and outcomes for New Zealand men.

Supported by personal stories from men living with metastatic prostate cancer, these sessions aim to explore the current challenges faced by New Zealand men and encourage men with advanced disease to talk about their futures and advocate for change.

Rea Wikaira, who is living with metastatic prostate cancer and worked within the healthcare system for more than 20 years, says his involvement with these education sessions is about giving metastatic prostate cancer a significant voice in our community. “I urge all men living with advanced prostate cancer to come along to these education sessions, to learn more about the disease, and to take an active role in defining their own future living with metastatic prostate cancer.”

ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER – PATIENT EDUCATION FORUMS:

Prostate Cancer Foundation, supported by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, is hosting a series of public forums to inform men and their families who are living with advanced, or metastatic, prostate cancer:

Wellington – Brentwood Hotel, Kilbirnie - Thursday 21st August 6-9pm

Auckland – Novotel Ellerslie – Saturday 23rd August 1-4pm

Christchurch – Novotel Cathedral Square – Tuesday 26th August 6-9pm

All welcome. To register your interest and receive more information please email holly@prostate.org.nz

PROSTATE CANCER IN NEW ZEALAND:


• In New Zealand, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the third most common cause of cancer death in men after lung cancer and bowel cancer.1

• Approximately 3,000 new cases of prostate cancer are diagnosed each year.1

• One in 13 men will develop prostate cancer before the age of 75.2

• Approximately 600 men die from metastatic prostate cancer each year.1

• Mãori men are 72 per cent more likely to die of prostate cancer once diagnosed than non-Mãori men.1

• Between 10 and 20% of men with prostate cancer progress to advanced (metastatic) prostate cancer within 5 years of diagnosis.3

• 20% of men with metastatic prostate cancer do not receive Androgen Deprivation Therapy within their first year of diagnosis.4


-ENDS-

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