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Health Benefits to Nelson Tasman from New Insulation Project

31 July 2014

Significant Health Benefits to Nelson Tasman from New Insulation Project

Significant economic and health benefits are being heralded as a result of the new Warmer Healthier Homes Project for the Nelson Tasman region.

The Canterbury Community Trust has partnered with the Nelson Tasman Housing Trust, Absolute Energy, Nelson Marlborough District Health Board and the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority in a project aimed at providing low income families, particularly those with high health risks, with warmer, more insulated homes says TCCT Lead Trustee, Bill Dahlberg.

The Canterbury Community Trust has committed $300,000 over two years to the Project through its Nelson Special Fund. The project team has received an allocation of EECA funding towards the project in the first year. Nelson Tasman Housing Trust are contracted to manage the project with the Nelson Marlborough District Health Board adding expertise as they have successfully completed a similar project some years ago. The Nelson Bays Primary Health organisation is assisting with the selection and delivery system.

The Project will deliver, through local provider Absolute Energy, the retrofitting of insulation and draught proofing materials in the first year to a targeted 100 homes and is intended to be a two to three year project with other interested groups being asked to be involved.

Initially the available funding is targeted for health related referrals via the Nelson Marlborough District Health Board. The needs of low income tenants of private sector landlords has been recognised as a serious issue by the Trust and NMDHB, and ways of engaging landlords with the scheme and making a contribution to installation costs are being actively considered .

“The Canterbury Community Trust believes the way forward is forming partnerships and working in collaboration with other funders and service providers so that we can better target the people in our community most at need and get the most tangible and measurable outcomes for the dollars spent,” says Mr Dahlberg.

Bill Dahlberg and retiring TCCT Trustee Max Spence presented this project to the Trust Board and have worked diligently and with passion in making this a reality for the region.

Mr Spence says this joint venue is a highlight of his time as a Trustee and it will provide access on a wider level to more families living in homes that are poorly insulated and will see significant economic benefits for our Nelson Tasman region, particularly around lower costs for heating and health care savings.

The Canterbury Community Trust - HISTORY
The deregulation of the banking industry in the 1980s was the catalyst for the formation of The Canterbury Community Trust. Established in 1988 it received an annual dividend from the Trust Bank which it distributed to not for profit organisations throughout its four funding regions of Canterbury, Nelson, Marlborough and the Chatham Islands. It received a further injection of capital in 1997 when Trust Bank was sold to Westpac and the profits of that sale were channeled to the Trust for the community.

Today the Canterbury Community Trust’s income comes from its capital base of over $500 million, which has been achieved through a prudent and extensive investment strategy. The Trust distributes annually around $20 million across nine sectors, in its four funding regions.

It receives no income from other funders or gaming machines making it unique and independent in the region’s philanthropic community.

www.commtrust.org.nz

ENDS

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