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Record number of Kiwis take on Dry July

Record number of Kiwis take on Dry July

The beginning of August means the end of Dry July for 6,041 Kiwis who embarked on a booze-free month to raise money for adults living with cancer.

This year, the campaign saw a massive 47% increase in participants, increasing from 4,100 in 2013. New Zealanders taking part in Dry July have now raised a total of $2 million for patients at Auckland Region and Northland Hospitals, Canterbury Regional Cancer and Haematology Service, and Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre over the last three years.

Dry July co-founder Brett McDonald says Dry July has been a huge success in New Zealand this year.

“The consistent increase in New Zealanders taking part in Dry July is fantastic. Seeing so many Kiwis go booze-free to help improve the wellbeing of adult cancer patients is incredibly gratifying,” he says.

“We’ve raised over $700,000 In New Zealand this year and with donations open throughout August we’re very hopeful that we’ll beat last year’s record of $765,000.”

Dry July began in Australia in 2008, launching in New Zealand in 2012. In the seven Dry July campaigns to date, more than 90,000 Dry July participants have collectively raised over $19m AUD, helping to support more than 40 different cancer services across New Zealand and Australia.

New Zealand’s current highest fundraiser, Andrew Brown, has raised over $7,000 in donations. He says every little bit counts, and he wanted to raise as much money as he could to make a difference for Kiwis with cancer down the track.

“One of my best friends passed away from a brain tumour last year, and I did Dry July to honour him. There were people who thought I couldn’t do a month without a drink or raise as much money as I have, but that just motivated me more,” he says.

“Cancer doesn’t discriminate – everyone is touched by this disease in some way. When I got out there and canvassed support for Dry July the donations just poured in, because everyone knows someone who has been affected by cancer.”

Brett says he hopes a month off the booze has been rewarding for this year’s Dry Julyers.

“As well as raising money for a fantastic cause, we see Dry July as an opportunity for participants to take some time out and focus on themselves. We hope Dry Julyers in New Zealand have achieved plenty throughout the month, it’s amazing what you can achieve without a hangover!”

ends

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