News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Nurses release more time to care

8 August 2014

Nurses release more time to care

Nurses have quadrupled the amount of time they spend with patients during a pilot of a world renowned programme at Auckland City Hospital.

The Releasing Time to Care (RTC) programme developed for Britain’s NHS empowers nurses to streamline ward processes, freeing them up to spend more time with patients.

Auckland City Hospital has adapted the programme for accelerated delivery and is rolling it out across more than 25 wards after a trial in the respiratory ward saw nurses’ direct patient care time increasing from 16 per cent to 73 per cent.

Auckland DHB chair Lester Levy says the adapted programme delivers patient-centred care, increases productivity and boosts staff morale. Those involved have adopted a philosophy of continuous improvement.

“Sustainable improvement does not come from doing one or two things 100 per cent better, but from doing a whole range of things five to 10 per cent better,” Dr Levy says.

“Some of the improvements seem really simple, for example putting the top 10 most used items in patient rooms. This relatively small act has increased direct care time with patients in neurosurgery by ten per cent,” he says.

Ward staff who took part in the pilot were asked to identify areas where processes could be more efficient and create an action plan to deliver them.

They introduced ‘bedside handovers’, in which key staff meet beside the patient’s bed to discuss exactly what will happen that day. The popular initiative puts the patient’s voice at the centre of their care.

Participants also came up with ‘patient status at a glance’ bed boards, greater involvement by all staff in ward rounds, new stickers to encourage patients to keep meal tables clear, better equipment storage and access and greater use of manual observation methods for appropriate patients.

Of the staff involved, 88 per cent now recommend their ward as a place to work compared with 66 per cent in 2010.

Patients who took part in the pilot expressed satisfaction rates of 95 per cent.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Repatriation: Moriori And Māori Ancestors Offered Dignity And Respect

The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa will hold a pōwhiri to mark the return home of 59 Māori and Moriori ancestral remains from the United Kingdom and Europe. More>>

Gibbs Farm: Kiwi Sculpture Park Rated As Site Of International Stature

29 May 2017 – The Wall Street Journal has honoured internationally renowned art patron and entrepreneur Alan Gibbs with a multi-page feature spread about his sculpture park at the Gibbs Farm, north of Auckland, in the June Issue of WSJ Magazine. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington Rugby Zeroes: Sevens To Move To Hamilton

Wellington Mayor Justin Lester: “The Sevens has been a big part of recent Wellington history but it was time for the event to move on… Wellingtonians have been voting with their feet in the last few years and we’ve seen the result in dwindling crowd numbers and lower ticket sales.” More>>

ALSO:

Matafeo & Dravid: The Billy T And Fred Award Winners For 2017

At the final show of the 2017 NZ International Comedy Festival powered by Flick Electric Co. the Festival came to a close after 115 shows in Auckland and 68 shows in Wellington. More>>

 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland