News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Five Years of Waikato Productive Wards Celebrated

Media Release

Date: 20 August 2014

Five Years of Waikato Productive Wards Celebrated


Patients in Waikato District Health Board’s Older Persons and Rehabilitation service are reaping the practical benefits of the DHB’s five-year commitment to the internationally acclaimed Productive Wards programme.

The programme empowers staff to look at how processes such as drugs rounds, ward rounds and discharges work.

http://www.waikatodhb.health.nz/about-us/news-and-events/news/five-years-of-waikato-productive-wards-celebrated/

It strips out what is stopping those processes from being better and release staff from activities that prevent them from direct patient care.

Patients in wards OPR 2-4 pay the staff plenty of compliments about the care they receive, said nurse manager Belinda Macfie.

“We bribe the patients with our smiles and we have clear expectations for our patients,” she said.
Releasing Time to Care was developed in the United Kingdom by the NHS Institute and introduced in New Zealand at several district health boards including Waikato, in 2009.

Releasing Time to Care is a staff-led programme using a modular structure allowing staff to control the improvements themselves.

It is now in place in all inpatient areas at Waikato Hospital, Emergency Department, Oncology, Women’s Health Assessment, Delivery Suite and Mothercraft as well as wards in Thames and Te Kuiti hospitals and starting soon at Tokoroa Hospital.

The productive programme also extended into other areas of health in the community, Mental Health and Radiology.

Quality and Patient Safety project manager Vin Kaur has been working in the programme since it started.

“This has been a huge journey. At first it was a struggle to get people to understand the concept but now after five years everyone wants to be a part of the programme.

“It wouldn’t have been that successful without the constant executive support. Every two weeks the chief executive, chief operating officer and director of nursing and midwifery would visit and spend an hour with the staff to see how things were going and how they could further help in the process.”

Director of Nursing and Midwifery Sue Hayward today held a special celebration in Waikato DHB’s Bryant Education Centre, cut a giant chocolate cake and handed out awards.

“It was a fun time, the awards were very tongue in cheek but everyone appreciated them.”

Mrs Macfie and the three charge nurses managers from the Older Persons and Rehabilitation service. Raewyn Lee, Neera Grover and Hayley Colmore-Williams work together as a team even though they are in charge of separate wards.

Productive wards started in each of their wards four years ago when they were in their former home in the Elizabeth Rothwell Building.

While the new year-old facilities in the Older Persons and Rehabilitation Building have helped productive wards, the reasons for the success lie in the team work.

“We meet once a week as charge nurse managers so if any of us are away, the others know what is going on in the ward,” said Ms Lee.

“We are using productive wards as a mechanism for professional development.”

Ms Colmore-Williams is a relative newcomer to the service but not to Productive Wards. The difference in Older Persons and Rehabiltiation was that the wards worked in a cluster.

“We all work together and have the same approach to staff handovers.

“It helps that each of the three wards have the same layout.”

But there is more to it than that.

“When we were in the Elizabeth Rothwell Building last year, before we moved here, we clearly explained the benefits of collaboration and role modelling.

“It’s to reduce the silos and to share the workload,” said Ms Macfie.

“Plus we share knowledge and experience. Making productive wards though doesn’t happen unless someone drives it through and here it is very much a team effort. It’s the culture and the fact that three (charge nurse managers) get together regularly.

Ms Kaur said she felt the Older Persons and Rehabilitation service were working Productive Wards the best of any area.

“There a lot of respect and good will and there’s a collectiveness which is impressive.”

Former chief executive Craig Climo, a regular attendee on Productive Wards tours, echoed that belief the service was operating Productive Wards better than any other before he left the DHB earlier this month.

“Why it stands out is the leadership in Older Persons and Rehabilitation, staff involvement and commitment including medical staff – junior and senior, and that three wards are doing things jointly.

“The results being achieved are outstanding, both in the areas targeted for improvement and the results from patient and staff satisfaction surveys.”

Chief operating officer Jan Adams said she liked the collaborative approach.

“It is very clear the charge nurse managers have a unified approach and are driving change through an agreed framework of productive wards and a clear older person's nursing strategy.

“They also have a good approach to including the wider team, they call it high achievers whereby two staff from each ward noted to be high achievers are mentored and take a significant part in the productive series, helping them prepare for senior leadership and wider responsibilities,” said Mrs Adams.

Director of nursing and midwifery Sue Hayward said the charge nurse managers in Older Persons and Rehabilitation moved from being very ambivalent about producitves to the point where they now have the vision that allows them to use methodologies in all improvements.

“They have taken control and are thoroughly enjoying the spin offs this is giving them.”


ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news