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Aix spa therapy revamp captures male attention

For Immediate Release

27 August, 2014

Aix spa therapy revamp captures male attention

The world of water therapy has been taken to higher luxurious levels at Polynesian Spa with new Italian Aix Therapy beds and stone tile floors creating the perfect space for your body’s ultimate indulgence.

Aix therapy combines jets of warm water with a relaxation massage to rejuvenate and revitalise the mind and body. Therapists use Rotorua thermal mud polish, Mānuka honey walnut polish, coconut or mango sugar rub to immerse the body into total relaxation.

Contrary to perception, Aix therapies are particularly popular amongst men making it a great present for Father’s Day.

In Rotorua, the Aix spa therapy concept was first introduced in 1903 and in those days it was claimed that the treatment helped with hysteria, engorged liver or piles. Today guests are promised the sensation of soft water jets combined with massage.

Regular Aix spa therapy client Joey Rihari says half the fun is to select a mineral pool to soak in before being taken through to the Retreat.

“The Aix massage feels like a hundred little fingers, massaging your body and the masseuse knows exactly where to add pressure with the warm water taking you to a place of bliss."

Polynesian Spa sales and marketing manager Simone de Jong says the Polynesian Spa Retreat had a modernised upgrade in 2012 and the Aix therapy rooms were the last piece of the puzzle to receive the luxury refurbishment.

She says a lot of research was done with travel around New Zealand and internationally to see other spas for the best Aix therapy inspiration.

“We came to the conclusion that we needed Aix beds which provided maximum comfort for the customer while also allowing therapists to get close enough to give the best possible massage.

“The bed also needed to catch falling water and oils with height adjustment options and a hydraulic system instead of electric because of the sulphurous environment in Rotorua.”

The result was a Vichy bed from Italy, used in many top spas around the world. Natural grey stone tiles have been used for the flooring which are non-slip and white tiles for the walls create a contemporary spa environment. Louvres and new lighting have also been added to create a tranquil atmosphere in the three Aix therapy rooms.

Polynesian Spa has also just introduced free Wi Fi access across the entire complex for customers so they can share their experiences online with friends and family instantly. Also a new digital sound system throughout the complex provides ambience from the moment you walk through the door.

Last month a new acidic mineral pool in the Deluxe Lake Spa was added providing therapy guests with access to both renowned acidic and alkaline mineral waters.

The acidic mineral water is sourced from the Priest Spring and is popular because it relieves tired muscles, aches and pains. The alkaline water from the Rachael Spring features the antiseptic action of sodium silicate which nourishes the skin. The combination of these two types of mineral waters is only found at Polynesian Spa.

For a number of years, Polynesian Spa has been recognised as one of the World Top Ten Spas (natural/ thermal/ medical) by readers of the UK Conde Nast Traveller Magazine, 2004-2007, 2009 and 2011.

ENDS

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