News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Now’s the time for cervical screening

Now’s the time for cervical screening

29 August 2014

Cervical Screening Awareness Month is coming up in September and MidCentral DHB is encouraging women who are due, or overdue, to book a smear test now.

Over 30,000 women across the region are up-to-date with their screening, and to encourage everyone else to join that number, smear tests will be free or subsidised (depending on the GP) from September until 30 November 2014.

If it’s one of the many things on your ‘to do list’, now is the time to tick it off. Women who are not sure when their smear is due, or who want to become part of the National Cervical Screening Programme can ring the free phone number 0800 729 729, see www.cervicalscreening.govt.nz , or contact their General Practice.

MDHB Cervical Screening Health Promotion Advisor Nicci Kuiti is aware that there are women who still are not having regular smear tests carried out.

She said: "Having regular cervical smears can reduce the risk of developing cervical cancer by 90 percent. If you are between the ages of 20 and 70 and have ever been sexually active, then it’s crucial that you have a regular smear test.”

Human papillomavirus (HPV), which is a very common infection, causes cell changes in the cervix. These cell changes happen very slowly and may clear on their own. However, if not found early, they can sometimes lead to cervical cancer. Having regular smears, every three years, means it is likely abnormal cells will be found and treated long before they progress to cancer.

Some women on yearly screening may now be offered an HPV test when they have their cervical smear. The test helps identify women who may need further follow-up with a specialist.

Ms Kuiti said: "A negative HPV test result indicates you are unlikely to be at risk of developing cervical cancer in the next three to five years. For some women, two negative tests can reduce the need for annual smears, and return them to three yearly screening. This needs to be discussed with your smear taker.

"A positive test result means a high-risk type of HPV has been found. In this case, your smear taker will talk to you about what follow-up is required so any cell changes can be treated early."

The HPV test is usually taken at the same time as the cervical smear test, using the same sample of cells, so there is no need to have a second test.

It’s important for women who have had the Gardisal (cervical cancer vaccine) to remember they still require regular cervical smears. The Gardisal vaccine protects against several types of HPV that cause cervical cancer and genital warts, but not all.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Law Society: Sir Peter Williams QC, 1934 - 2015

“Sir Peter was an exceptional advocate. He had the ability to put the defence case for his clients with powerful oratory. His passion shone through in everything he did and said.” Mr Moore says Sir Peter’s lifelong commitment to prison reform was instrumental in ensuring prison conditions and the rights of prisoners were brought to public attention. More>>

ALSO:

CTU: Peter Conway – Family Statement

Peter committed his whole working life to improving the lives of working people, both in unions and, more recently, as the Economist and Secretary of the Council of Trade Unions. He was previously Chair of Oxfam New Zealand and was on the Board of NZ Trade and Enterprise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news