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Paint Yourself Blue This September for Prostate Cancer

Paint Yourself Blue This September for Prostate Cancer


With more than 3000 Kiwi men being diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, the PlaceMakers Blue Streak is yet again zipping around the length and breadth of the country to raise awareness of the Prostate Cancer Foundation’s Blue September appeal.

The blue-clad superhero resplendent in flowing cape has become synonymous with Blue September and his infamous Swanndri undies are once more for sale at PlaceMakers stores nationwide. The 100% cotton blue and black check Swanndri undies with the ‘get checked’ message to promote early detection are the perfect gift this Father’s Day, costing $25 each with $10 from every sale going to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

For the first time PlaceMakers will also be giving out PCF Blue Ribbons in exchange for a gold coin donation at counters.

Blue September Patron Sir Peter Leitch, aka the Mad Butcher, urges Kiwi blokes to drop the ‘she’ll be right’ attitude and prioritise having regular health checks.

“Prostate cancer is indiscriminate and can hit at any time. I strongly urge you to have a check-up, if not for yourself then for your family. We know that men have better health outcomes if diagnosed early, so put aside any discomfort or embarrassment and get checked because this might save your life!”

A number of other well-known ambassadors are supporting Blue September, including Lady Deborah Holmes, actor Mark Hadlow, ex-All Blacks Buck Shelford and Stu Wilson, comedian Tarun Mohanbhai, celebrity chef Brett McGregor, musicians Ray Woolf and Frankie Stevens.

PlaceMakers is now in its sixth year of supporting Blue September and has proudly raised $1.3 million used by the Prostate Cancer Foundation towards research and public education programmes into testicular and prostate cancer, and providing pastoral care to Kiwi men and their families.

Dean Fradgley, Chief Executive for PlaceMakers says: “PlaceMakers is proud to have contributed over a million dollars in the last six years to the cause. The Prostate Cancer Foundation advise us that approximately 50 per cent is used for awareness and education, 30 per cent to facilitate care and support and the remaining 20 per cent put towards vital research.

“We urge locals to get down to PlaceMakers, pick up a pair of undies and get in behind Blue September and help save the lives of our fathers, brothers, sons and mates.”

Prostate Cancer Foundation reports more Kiwi men are getting checked than ever before but approximately 600 New Zealand males die from the disease every year – a number which is still too high.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in New Zealand males. One in 10 Kiwi men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime. Awareness and early diagnosis saves lives, in fact half of the annual prostate cancer mortality rate could be prevented by early detection.

Facts about Prostate Cancer in New Zealand

• Blue September is the awareness campaign for the Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ

• Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in NZ men – 3000 men are diagnosed every year

• 1 in 10 NZ men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetime

• Over 600 New Zealand men per year are dying from prostate cancer

• Many of these deaths could be prevented by early detection and healthy lifestyle choices

• We encourage all men over 40 to have an annual prostate check in the form of a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test. Every man’s PSA levels are different. We advise men to keep a track of their levels and any spike in PSA levels should be followed up with a doctor immediately.

• All funds raised from Blue September go to the Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand, a registered charity that receives no government funding. Part of the Foundation's role involves supporting research. A recent example of current research funding is a new study on bone health for men on androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) being conducted by the University of Auckland.

-Ends-

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