News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search


Southern women are urged to think about the ones they love

Southern women are urged to think about the ones they love this September and have a smear

Southern women are being asked to consider the impact their health has on family and friends this September, by ensuring that their smears are up to date as part of Cervical Screening Awareness Month.

The focus of September’s Cervical Screening Awareness Month is to inspire women to think about the wider effect their health has on those they love – and how it is worth putting their health first for the ones they love.

“A cervical smear test usually takes less than fifteen minutes and should be done every three years. It is a simple procedure that has the proven ability to save lives,” commented Southern DHB Population Health Service Manager, Sharyn Robson.

Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancers and results show that screening every three years can reduce the risk of developing it by up to 90 per cent.

The cervical smear test is a screening test to find abnormal changes in the cells of the cervix. These cell changes are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) virus. HPV infection is very common, and most people come into contact with it at some stage of their life.

To support Cervical Screening Awareness Month in the Southern DHB district every woman who has a smear during the month of September will have the opportunity to enter a draw to win one of several gift baskets, and the DHB will also have notice boards up in their hospitals with information about Cervical Screening.

With cervical screening rates for Maori, Pacific and Asian women around 10 to 20 per cent lower than other groups these women are a particular priority.

“The changes in the cervix from HPV infection happen very slowly. By having regular smears there is an excellent chance that the abnormal cells will be found and treated long before they ever become cancer,” commented Ms Robson.

“A cervical smear test saves lives because it’s all about finding changes early. The sooner we can pick up any abnormal cells, the sooner a woman can be treated”.

The goal of the National Cervical Screening Programme is to reduce the number of women in New Zealand who develop cervical cancer.

Regular cervical smear tests are the best prevention, and screening every three years is recommended for women aged 20 to 70 years who have ever been sexually active.

“It’s easy to find out when your next smear is due. Call your GP, Family Planning or free-phone 0800 729 729,” said Ms Robson.

For more information visit


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news