News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Heart Foundation weighs in on sugary drinks debate

05 September 2015

Heart Foundation weighs in on sugary drinks debate


With the 2014 election just weeks away the Heart Foundation says it’s time our politicians took a stand, on behalf of future generations, on the availability and consumption of sugary drinks.

The Heart Foundation is calling on all political parties to support a food and nutrition plan for children to ensure a brighter future for the next generation of Kiwi kids. An integral part of the plan will be the implementation of a tax and, or other regulatory measures on sugary soft drinks.

Public Health Strategic Advisor for the Heart Foundation, Sally Hughes says with a staggering 31% of our children overweight or obese the time for action is now.

“Nutrition professionals recommend limiting ‘added’ sugar intake for health because there is evidence on the effect of ‘added ‘sugar on body weight, which is a risk factor for heart disease.

“There’s also evidence suggesting an association between sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages and risk factors for heart disease, for example Type 2 Diabetes and blood pressure,” she said.

The Foundation’s sugar position also recommends people cut back on foods or drinks that are high in ‘added’ sugar with little nutritional value, such as soft drinks or cordials, cakes and biscuits. As well as lobbying for change and promoting a healthy balanced diet, the Foundation is also encouraging food manufacturers to reformulate their products to include less added sugar and sodium.

“The call for Nutrition Plan for Children and urgent action on sugary drinks is part our ‘Stop the Heartbreak’ political manifesto. It’s one part of the manifesto but perhaps the most important if we are to ensure our children have bright future, free of heart disease and ill health,” she said.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has recommended that added sugar is limited to 5 - 10% of calories consumed - five percent to protect teeth from decay and 10% to control body weight.

Further information:

Have you ever wondered whether there is one way to eat well? Click here to read a blog post by the Heart Foundation’s Tick Programme Dietician Sarah Goonan.

The Heart Foundation’s National Nutrition Advisor, Delvina Gorton talks sugar following Nigel Latta’s recent TV show on the sweet stuff. Click here to access the blog post.


ENDS

About the Heart Foundation:
The Heart Foundation is the charity that works to stop New Zealanders dying prematurely from heart disease. It is committed to promoting heart health through funding vital research, promoting heart healthy lifestyles and advancing cardiac care.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Kakī: World’s Rarest Wading Bird Released In Mackenzie Basin

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says the birds will add to the 60 released into the Tasman valley earlier this month, significantly boosting the wild population. More>>

ALSO:

IHC Tribute: Colin Meads

"While Colin is best known for rugby, to us he is one of a small number of distinguished IHC New Zealand Life Members recognised for their significant support for people with intellectual disabilities," says IHC Chief Executive Ralph Jones. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Tilting at Turbines - The Trip to Spain

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon have now both broken the Big Fifty barrier, which seems to have brought a whole new level of angst to their midlife adventures ... More>>

Review: A Rose By Any Other Name Would Smell As Sweet

The Royal New Zealand Ballet has accepted the challenge of this heart-touching tragedy and largely succeeded. More>>

ALSO:

NZ's First Male IAAF Gold: Tom Walsh's Historic Shot Put Victory

Although feeling very sore but with a great feeling Tom Walsh took his place as number one on the victory dais to receive his much deserved gold medal. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Hard To Find Books

"Unfortunately we are in crisis and this friendly dinosaur faces extinction… Our only hope is to try and raise funds to buy the building and restore it to its glory, either fully funded or with a viable deposit." More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland