News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Consumer NZ and Cancer Society call for ban on sunbeds

Consumer NZ and Cancer Society call for outright ban on sunbeds


Consumer NZ and the Cancer Society are calling for an outright ban on commercial sunbeds.

Although both organisations support amendments to the Health (Protection) Amendment Bill banning the provision of sunbed services to under-18s, they argue the ban does not go far enough.

Chief executive Sue Chetwin says Consumer has been surveying sunbed businesses for over a decade and the results have been alarming.

“Our mystery shopper surveys in 2010, 2011 and 2012 found many operators ignoring – or unaware of – the safety guidelines of the voluntary standard (AS/NZ 2635:2008). In our 2013 survey, two-thirds of sunbed operators did not comply with the standard,” she said.

The proposed amendments to the Health (Protection) Amendment Bill will only protect under-18s but the rest of the population will still be at risk.

Ms Chetwin said the evidence linking tanning devices to skin cancer was unequivocal. In July 2009, the World Health Organisation’s International Agency for Research on Cancer classified tanning devices as “carcinogenic to humans” and in the highest cancer risk category, alongside substances such as tobacco, asbestos and arsenic.

Claire Austin, Chief Executive of the Cancer Society said New Zealand has the highest skin cancer rate in the world.

“Skin cancer, our most common cancer, comes at a cost of over $123 million to our health system each year. Yet over 90% of skin cancers are preventable. We need to be doing as much as we can to ensure fewer New Zealanders are affected by the burden. Banning sunbeds is a good step.”

Chetwin says Brazil and most states in Australia have introduced bans on commercial solariums in an attempt to reduce rates of skin cancer. Consumer and the Cancer Society think New Zealand should follow suit.

The risks involved in continuing to allow New Zealanders to tan this way are just too great, Ms Chetwin said.

Consumer NZ and the Cancer Society are presenting their submissions on the Health (Protection) Amendment Bill at a select committee hearing today.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis Review: Reclaiming The N-Word - Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman

Black resistance to institutional racism in the US has a long, tangled, and traumatic intellectual history. Although we may have assumed much too easily that white supremacists like David Duke had become marginalised as a political force, in reality they never really disappeared ... More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Minstrel in The Gallery - Sam Hunt's Selected Poems

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Sam Hunt's poetry is its quality of urgent authenticity. Encountering this latest compilation, the reader is immediately struck by its easy accessibility, tonal sincerity, and lack of linguistic pretension ... More>>

A Matter Of Fact: Truth In A Post-Truth World

How do we convincingly explain the difference between good information and misinformation? And conversely, how do we challenge our own pre-conceived notions of what we believe to be true? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Road To Unfreedom

Valerie Morse: Yale professor of history Tim Snyder publishes a stunning account of the mechanisms of contemporary Russian power in US and European politics. In telling this story he presents both startling alarms for our own society and some mechanisms of resistance. More>>

ALSO:

Doing Our Bit: An Insider's Account Of New Zealand Political Campaigning

In 2013, Murdoch Stephens began a campaign to double New Zealand’s refugee quota. Over the next five years he built the campaign into a mainstream national movement – one that contributed to the first growth in New Zealand’s refugee quota in thirty years. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland