News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Canada shows that assisted suicide is a cliff

Canada shows that assisted suicide is a cliff, not a slippery slope

John Kleinsman, Chair of the Care Alliance, says that Canada is providing a stark warning that “assisted suicide is a cliff, not a slippery slope”.

The Canadian government last week submitted a bill that would legalise ‘medical assistance in dying’ in response to the Supreme Court’s judgment last year in Carter v Canada.

The National Post columnist Andrew Coyne has highlighted that the chief complaint of euthanasia advocates about the bill is that “it does not include children and the mentally incompetent.”

What once was unthinkable is now indispensable. The extraordinary step of authorizing doctors (and nurse practitioners: another innovation), sworn down the centuries to save lives, to take them instead, has been swallowed and digested as if it were nothing. The debate has moved on to its next inevitable stage.

Dr Kleinsman says the Canadian experience shows there is no logical limit once you start legalising assisted suicide. “Taking the single, fateful step of believing that assisting suicide is a legitimate response to suffering puts you in free fall. You simply cannot withhold it from some if you allow it for others.”

He noted that David Seymour’s End of Life Choice Bill proposes legalising euthanasia and assisted suicide for anyone over the age of 18. “If Mr Seymour truly believes it is compassionate for the State to kill adults, why on earth would he withhold such ‘compassion’ from children?

Belgium, the Netherlands and now Canada show that is exactly where this thinking leads you, and Mr Seymour should at least be honest about it.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis Review: The Minstrel in The Gallery - Sam Hunt's Selected Poems

Perhaps the most striking aspect of Sam Hunt's poetry is its quality of urgent authenticity. Encountering this latest compilation, the reader is immediately struck by its easy accessibility, tonal sincerity, and lack of linguistic pretension ... More>>

A Matter Of Fact: Truth In A Post-Truth World

How do we convincingly explain the difference between good information and misinformation? And conversely, how do we challenge our own pre-conceived notions of what we believe to be true? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: The Road To Unfreedom

Valerie Morse: Yale professor of history Tim Snyder publishes a stunning account of the mechanisms of contemporary Russian power in US and European politics. In telling this story he presents both startling alarms for our own society and some mechanisms of resistance. More>>

ALSO:

Doing Our Bit: An Insider's Account Of New Zealand Political Campaigning

In 2013, Murdoch Stephens began a campaign to double New Zealand’s refugee quota. Over the next five years he built the campaign into a mainstream national movement – one that contributed to the first growth in New Zealand’s refugee quota in thirty years. More>>

Te Papa: Two Reviews Into Care For Collections

Te Papa will take additional time to consider the best way to deliver its collections care function, including undertaking an independent review into the care of its natural history collections. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland