News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


$800,000 of funding into new child health research projects

Monday, 19 December 2016

Cure Kids announces $800,000 of funding into new child health research projects

Cure Kids has today announced the recipients of just over $800,000 in grants to fund vital child health research projects throughout the country.

The projects span a broad range of conditions affecting children including obesity, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), bone disorders, and child cancer.

This year’s annual grant round attracted more than 30 applications across a variety of child health research needs, with 10 projects successfully receiving funding, totalling more than $800,000.

The funding includes a collaboration between Shares in Life Foundation (SiLF) and Cure Kids which has enabled the funding of two projects focussing on treatments for the genetic condition, cystic fibrosis.

“It is an exciting time of the year for the organisation. We are privileged to work with many of our nation’s best scientists to tackle vital unmet needs in child health,” says Cure Kids CEO, Frances Benge.

The Shares in Life Foundation is the research arm of Cystic Fibrosis New Zealand and Chief Executive Jane Bollard has welcomed the opportunity to work with Cure Kids to fund vital research.

“This agreement formalises a long-standing relationship with Cure Kids, resulting in the co-funding of research projects that are likely to result in an improvement in the care and quality of life of people with cystic fibrosis,” she said.

Mrs. Benge says the projects were selected by an independent science panel, comprising leading experts in child health.

“Where possible, Cure Kids works to minimise barriers encountered by researchers when accessing funding for high-quality projects.

“We see it as a strength to be led by the scientists; it’s their innovative thinking that has the potential to deliver the greatest impact,” she said.

For the researchers being funded, the outcome of the granting round provides relief in what is a difficult funding landscape.

Professor Steven Dakin, Head of the School of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of Auckland, said the funding would be vital in helping advance an exciting new area in diagnosis and treatment of children with ASD.

“The role that Cure Kids plays in improving the health and well-being of our children is tremendous. Their support allows researchers like me, to apply innovation and explore areas that many of traditional funding bodies would not support.”

Prof Dakin’s work is investigating how the monitoring of children’s eye movements could assist in earlier diagnosis and potential treatment for kids with ASD.

The grants are for projects between one to three years in duration, and all will commence in 2017.

Cure Kids is New Zealand’s leading funder of child health research. They’ve invested over $38 million into child health research projects since its establishment in 1971.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Sheep: Shearing Record Smashed In Hawke’s Bay

Three shearers gathered from around New Zealand have smashed a World record by 264 sheep despite the heat, the pumiced sheep of inland Hawke’s Bay and a year’s wool weighing an average of over 3.5kg a sheep. More>>

ALSO:

Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    ALSO:

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Health
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news