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Canterbury GP teams providing care around the clock

31 May 2017

Canterbury GP teams providing care around the clock

With winter on our doorstep, Canterbury DHB is encouraging people to make their GP team their first call whenever they need health advice.

Dr Alistair Humphrey, Medical Officer of Health and part-time GP, says people can phone their GP team any time of day or night.

“Even after-hours you can call your usual general practice number and when they’re closed, a team of nurses is available to answer your call. The nurses provide free health advice, and if you need to be seen urgently by a doctor, they can tell you what to do and where to go,” says Dr Humphrey.

“If you save your general practice phone number in your mobile phone, that’s the only number you need to access health advice 24/7.”

Dr Humphrey says winter is a really busy time for the Canterbury Health System, with increased rates of illness and greater demand on hospital services.

“It’s always important people access the most appropriate health care, and in most cases this is your general practice team, even after-hours. Don’t wait until it’s too late – phone your GP team before things get worse,” says Dr Humphrey.

If you phone your GP team after-hours and need urgent medical attention they will advise on the most appropriate place to go to receive the care you need.

If a friend or family member needs life-saving emergency medical attention always call 111 for an ambulance.

If you’re unsure whether it’s an emergency phone your GP team any time of day or night.

People who are not enrolled with a general practice team are missing out! More information on the benefits of enrolling is available at www.cdhb.health.nz/carearoundtheclock

-ends-


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