News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Go Spotty Day – Melanoma NZ


Go Spotty Day – Melanoma NZ


On Friday 17th of November thousands of New Zealanders will be going ‘spotty’ to raise awareness of melanoma –a disease that affects so many people in this country every year. “We want to get people in the community thinking about melanoma and checking their skin for ‘spots’ or signs that could save lives” says Melanoma NZ Event Manager, Megan Rees

Event Details:

Who: People from around the country are encouraged to wear spots to school or work for the day. So far participants range from pre-schoolers and Auckland Council workers through to Pilates instructors and graphic designers.

What:
Participants wear anything spotty - sock’s, hats, hair ties, pants, t-shirts, gloves, ties, tights, dress, shirt, earrings. From head to toe or just an accessory. A gold coin donation for all 'Go Spotty' participants is appreciated to support Melanoma NZ’s ongoing work to prevent avoidable deaths.

Where: Schools, offices, playgroups, hospitals, retail shops, cafes….everywhere.

Why: New Zealand has the highest melanoma incidence rate in the world. Every year over 300 New Zealanders die from melanoma and there are 4000 new diagnoses. These are shocking statistics for a cancer that is largely preventable. More people die of melanoma than on NZ roads. It is known that with more awareness, better prevention and earlier detection, fewer kiwis will die from this mainly avoidable disease.

“I shared a SunSmart presentation with the whole school yesterday and we discussed Go Spotty Day. It was heart-warming this morning to walk into a class of 5yr olds and see them independently applying sunblock and putting on their sunglasses and hat before going out to play at 8.45am!” said Deputy Principal, Jo Thorburn from Upper Harbour Primary School. Jo Thorburn has been personally affected by melanoma as her mother passed away earlier this year from this disease. She knows the importance of prevention and early detection.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Howard Davis Article: A Musical Axis - Brahms, Wagner, Sibelius

Brahms' warm and exquisitely subtle Symphony No. 3 in F major, Wagner's irrepressibly sentimental symphonic poem Siegfried Idyll, and Sibelius' chilling and immensely challenging Violin Concerto in D minor exemplify distinct stages of development in a tangled and convoluted series of skirmishes that came to define subsequent disputes about the nature of post-Romantic orchestral writing well into the following century. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: A Pale Ghost Writer

Reviewed by Ruth Brassington, Richard Flanagan's new novel is about a novelist hastily ghost-writing the biography of a crook about to go to trial. The reader is kept on a cliff-edge, as the narrator tries to get blood out of his stone man. More>>

Negotiations Begin: Equal Conditions For Men & Women In Professional Football

The trade union representing New Zealand's professional footballers has initiated bargaining for an agreement securing equal terms and conditions for men and women. If negotiated, it will be the first agreement of its kind in the world. More>>

ALSO:


New Zealand Wars Commemoration: Witi Ihimaera's Sleeps Standing Moetū

The second of several articles to mark Rā Maumahara, remembering the New Zealand Land Wars. The first was a Q&A with Vincent O’Malley, author of The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800–2000. More>>

ALSO:


Howard Davis Review: Conflict & Resistance - Ria Hall's Rules of Engagement

From the aftermath of war through colonisation to her own personal convictions, Hall's new CD addresses current issues and social problems on multiple levels, confirming her position as a polemical and preeminent voice on the indigenous NZ music scene. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland