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‘Power for Good’ powers small and sick babies

‘Power for Good’ powers small and sick babies

Powershop have launched a new charity product to support those parents dealing with the stress and anxiety of a neonatal journey.

‘Power for Good’ allows Powershop customers to purchase power and donate to The Neonatal Trust in one go. A portion of their purchase is a donation that is passed on to The Neonatal Trust.

The Neonatal Trust Executive Director Neil O’Styke says “We are absolutely delighted to have been selected by Powershop as the first charity involved”. He added, “The Powershop team have been incredible to deal with, and the launch of ‘Power for Good’ follows their support of, and hands-on involvement, with our Mother’s Day packs”.
(Powershop donated 400 Powerbanks to our Mother’s Day ‘pick-me-up’ packs, plus a team of Powershop staff members helped to physically pack the 400 packs on their premises. Details here).

Mark Soper, Powershop General Manager stated “We're delighted to be able to support such a worthwhile cause and one that impacts so many Kiwis”.

“The charity really struck a chord with the team. We have a number of staff who had personally experienced the stress involved with having a baby in a neonatal unit”

Soper added, “It’s a cause that resonates with all Kiwis. They do fabulous work supporting the families of premature or sick full-term babies as they make their journey through neonatal intensive care, the transition home, and onwards”.

About ‘Power for Good’:
• ‘Power for Good’ is a 3 month campaign
• In the first month alone, over $5,000 was raised for The Neonatal Trust
• Powershop is proud to have created the product that enables customers to donate to The Neonatal Trust, and will be following up with additional support directly from Powershop.
• To learn more about ‘Power for Good’, visit www.neonataltrust.org.nz/powershop

Key neonatal statistics:
• There are 350+ incubators and cots in neonatal units across New Zealand
• Babies are classified as premature if they are born before 37 weeks gestation. A normal pregnancy lasts 40 weeks. On average, every day 16 babies are born premature in New Zealand
• Approximately 1 in 10 of babies born in New Zealand every year arrive early. That's one every 90 minutes, and over 5,000 in total. Some arrive as early as 16 weeks premature (24 weeks gestation).
Many more babies arrive full-term but require specialist care in a neonatal unit due to health issues
• Some stays in a neonatal unit last just a few days, others take a very long time. For example, from the personal stories on The Neonatal Trust website:
* Charlotte, born 23 weeks 3 days, weighing 650grams - 132 days before going home for the first time.
To read more, head to: www.neonataltrust.org.nz/personal-stories


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
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