News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Strength Training for All Ages

Whether it’s lifting weights in the gym, completing a bodyweight challenge at the park, or using any number of the tools available, the inclusion of activity to increase muscle strength and composition is important for your long term health and wellness.

Strength training is about ensuring you have a functioning body that can do what you need it to, without risk of injury or fatigue.

All movement has benefits for health and wellness, but strength training comes with added benefits including;

• Increased muscle mass and reduction in the speed of muscle loss as we age

• Increased bone strength

• Better stability and balance

• Ease of completing every day activities

• Lowered blood pressure

Research has indicated that a day spent seated cannot be undone by a single workout. But researchers at the Glasgow University found that people with low grip strength or low fitness levels had faced twice the risk when engaged in long periods of sedentary activities such as watching TV, than on participants who had the highest levels of fitness and grip strength. Risks include a number of conditions including cancer, and heart disease. The researchers believe that increasing strength and fitness may somewhat offset the adverse health consequences of spending a large proportion of leisure time sitting down and watching a screen.

Strength training is not just about lifting weights, although that is an excellent option. A great example of integrating exercise to strengthen the cardiovascular system in conjunction with strength training is High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). HIIT involves alternating between higher intensity bursts of exercise, with time to rest in between activities, and this high intensity exercise often includes strength training exercises.

The benefits of strength training are not just proven for those who remain active and injury free; there is increasing understanding that exercise, including strength training, can benefit a range of specific health conditions, especially those that are prevalent in older adults such as arthritis, and Parkinson’s disease.

Traditionally older adults have been recommended to do light aerobic work to improve heart health and balance to decrease the chance of falls. While these two components are still regarded as important, there is also a benefit in participating in strength training which involves using resistance while exercising. This can be exercises with weights, but there are plenty of other options too.

Strength training is not ‘one size fits all’ and as with any physical activity, has some risks. However, by working with an appropriately qualified and registered exercise professional, the exercise and activity can be customised to your specific needs, exercise and medical history, thus minimising risk and maximising results.

It’s never too late to get started into strength training, so regardless of your age, today is a great day to gets started!

References:
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/05/180524174604.htm


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Westpac Exiting Cake Tin: Stadium Announces Naming Rights Agreement With Sky

Wellington Regional Stadium Trust (WRST) and Sky Network Television Ltd (Sky) have announced a new partnership that will see Sky secure the naming rights of the Stadium from 1 January 2020. More>>

ASB Classic: Serena Williams Confirmed For 2020

One of the biggest names in sport has confirmed she will be returning to the ASB Classic in 2020. Twenty-three time Grand Slam singles champion Serena Williams will return to Auckland’s ASB Tennis Arena to challenge for the ASB Classic title. More>>

Netball: Taurua To Coach Silver Ferns Through Two More Campaigns

Netball New Zealand has confirmed Taurua will guide the Silver Ferns as they take on the Australian Diamonds in October’s Cadbury Netball Series (Constellation Cup), along with the Northern Quad Series in late January. More>>

ALSO:

Bigger But Less Novel Than The Parrot: Giant Fossil Penguin Find

The discovery of Crossvallia waiparensis, a monster penguin from the Paleocene Epoch (between 66 and 56 million years ago), adds to the list of gigantic, but extinct, New Zealand fauna. These include the world’s largest parrot, a giant eagle, giant burrowing bat, the moa and other giant penguins. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland