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Well Child app 2.0

MEDIA RELEASE
18 September 2018

Well Child app 2.0: Update has enhanced features to manage the health of tamariki



An app that helps New Zealand whānau transition into parenthood has had an upgrade.

The Well Child app, developed in 2016 as part the Nelson Marlborough Health Maternal and Child Health Integration project, helps parents manage the health and wellbeing of their tamariki (children).

Once downloaded, parents can upload a photo of their child and enter their details, including who their GP, midwife or Well Child provider is, and information about their family health history, allergies, blood type and more.

The app then uses the child’s date of birth to automatically set reminders for Well Child check-ups and vaccinations.

The Well Child 2.0 version also sends parents and caregivers’ timely, targeted and personalised health and wellness information according to the age of their child.

Midwife, Project Lead Manager and Core Concept Designer Kelly Mahuika says the app is not a replacement for the Well Child Tamariki Ora, My Health Book (commonly referred to as the Plunket book) but it has the added benefit of easy access, from a multitude of health providers, to information on the go or at home.

The 2.0 version was redesigned and developed locally in Nelson in collaboration with other governmental and non-governmental agencies from around the country.

Mahuika says the updated version of the app is more intuitive to use and is a sustainable, evidence based, specialised, health and education tool.

“It ensures the information is up to date, all the while creating consistency in the health and wellness advice families receive regardless of where they live in New Zealand,” she says.

The app’s new graphing capabilities are also easier to log and read.

Nelson Marlborough Health paediatrician Dr Nick Baker says the free Well Child app helps families keep kids well by getting the right care at the right time.

“Keeping up to date with issues like immunisation and dental care is vital to prevent diseases and stop future problems,” he says.

Dr Baker says he is happy to continue championing the Well Child 2.0 app

“The app is excellent – full of information that is correct and digestible.”

Mahuika and Baker believe the Well Child app 2.0 is an innovative resource that demonstrates that the health systems in New Zealand are adapting to better connect with the people who use their services.

The Well Child App 2.0 is a platform on which healthcare providers can potentially increase access to relevant information to help improve child health outcomes in New Zealand.

Whānau who have been using the original version of The Well Child App (1.0) will need to download The Well Child App 2.0 to benefit from the upgraded features.

The app is free to download for either IOS or Android devices from either Apple IOS or the Google play store.

You can follow the progress of the re-launch, and get the details on the up-coming promotional roadshow by liking and following our Facebook page, The Well Child App 2.0.

Ends

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