News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Time to reflect on 1918 influenza pandemic


One hundred years ago the influenza pandemic killed an estimated 9000 New Zealanders during this country’s largest public health crisis, says Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage chief historian Neill Atkinson.
“The majority of deaths occurred between October and December 1918, so as we come into this period a century later it’s important to reflect on and commemorate this major event in our history,” Neill Atkinson says.

“No other event has claimed so many New Zealand lives in such a short time. More than half as many New Zealanders died from influenza in three months as died while serving during the four years of the First World War.”

The commemoration has links to the First World War. It acknowledges the impact the flu pandemic had on Western Samoa, which resulted in the death of a quarter of Western Samoa’s population. A dance piece called ‘1918’ by Pacific performing arts group Le Moana will be showcased at Pukeahu National War Memorial Park in early November to mark this tragic event.

“A number of events will be happening throughout the country to remember the pandemic and inform the public. These include performances, public talks, digital storybooks and guided walks to remember the lives of those lost.

“We are planning to have a plaque to commemorate the influenza pandemic installed at Pukeahu early next year.

“The commemoration is also a reminder that we remain at risk from influenza viruses, and need to be aware of the ways that risk can be minimised by seasonal flu vaccines, good hygiene practices like cough and sneeze etiquette, and being prepared to look after yourself and family,” Neill Atkinson says.

More information is available on the Ministry for Culture and Heritage website regarding the commemoration and Ministry of Health website for health resources.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Renée, Wystan Curnow, Michael Harlow:: PM's Awards For Literary Achievement

Feminist and working-class stories, poetry as song, and a deeper understanding of New Zealand art – these are just some of the frontiers explored by this year’s winners of the Prime Minister’s Awards for Literary Achievement. More>>

ALSO:

It's A Coo: Kererū Crowned Bird Of The Year For 2018

With a whoosh-whoosh, the kererū has swooped to glory for the first time, in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition. More>>

ALSO:

Mustelids: Zealandia Traps Weasel Intruder

Zealandia has successfully trapped a weasel discovered within the protected wildlife sanctuary... The female weasel was found in a DOC200 trap by a Zealandia Ranger, at the southern end of the sanctuary where the animal was first detected. More>>

Howard Davis Review: Stray Echoes Leave No Trace

Writer and director Dustin Feneley's feature debut is a beautifully lyrical and cinematic tone poem that brings an unflinching eye to loneliness and isolation. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland