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Scooter popularity is on the rise. So are trips to the ED


New Zealand emergency doctors are seeing more patients coming in due to electric scooter-related injuries.

Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) New Zealand Faculty Chair Dr John Bonning, who will also become President-Elect of the College later this month, said the wave of injuries was a concern.

ACEM is the governing organisation for emergency medicine specialists in New Zealand and Australia.

“Injuries are coming in fast and furious,” Dr Bonning said.

“Our members are reporting a spike in accidents, several quite serious.”

Injuries have included fractures, lacerations and abrasions, broken teeth, head injuries and even collapsed lungs.

“The public need to understand these scooters are not toys,” Dr Bonning said. “They are capable of high speeds, and when ridden on footpaths where there are a high number of pedestrians, they can pose a serious issue to yourself and others.

“My message to the public is: before getting on one, put on a helmet, and importantly know what you are doing.”

Dr Bonning said scooter companies also had an obligation to ensure safety for users and other public is a top priority.

“We have seen these shared electric scooters become very popular in a short amount of time since they have been introduced in Auckland and Christchurch,” Dr Bonning said.

“We anticipate this popularity will rise as they are introduced across the country, so we want to make sure our elected officials and representatives who are giving them the green light have thought about the regulation of the scooters, from a safety perspective.”

Background

ACEM is the peak body for emergency medicine in New Zealand and Australia, responsible for training emergency physicians and advancement of professional standards. www.acem.org.au

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