News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

What matters at end of life

National campaign encourages conversations about what matters at end of life


Tuesday 19 February 2019


He kaupapa whakatairanga ā-motu e whakatītina ana i ngā kōrerorero mō ngā mea nui i te whakamatenga

A new campaign Kia kōrero | Let’s talk encourages people to plan for their future health care, with a focus on what matters to them. It features the personal stories of six New Zealanders at different stages of life and wellness. The campaign was launched today [note: Tuesday 19 Feb] by Minister of Health Hon Dr David Clark.

The campaign is part of the advance care planning programme managed by the Health Quality & Safety Commission and supported by district health boards.

‘An advance care plan tells your loved ones and health care teams about the treatment and care you want so treatment plans can support what is important to you,’ says Ria Earp, chair of the Commission’s Te Rōpū Māori (Māori advisory group).

‘When a patient has an advance care plan, knowing their values and what is important to them can make their treatment approach clearer and easier to follow. It is very important that we maintain a patient’s integrity and mana when we make plans for their future.’

The campaign begins with the story of Arthur Te Anini, who has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Arthur says having an advance care plan is a huge relief to him, and he now feels he can get on with his life and not have to worry about things. ‘This is my plan, it’s been designed by me - not by the doctors, not by my children, but by me.’



Well-known poet, writer and advocate of Māori arts, culture and political rights Keri Kaa shares her thoughts about what is most important to her, as her life draws to a close. ‘I never thought that being cared for by home people would be important,’ she says, ‘but it is.’

Equally engaging and moving are the stories of Pusi and Sima Urale, Cheryl Cameron, Noel Tiano, and Clive Aspin and his partner Terry. They all have one thing in common - a commitment to be clear about their future health care, and to share this understanding with those who need to know.

The campaign features videos of all the personal stories, and will be run primarily on social media. Videos and visuals will be subtitled in te reo Māori, Samoan and Tongan.

Commission chief executive Dr Janice Wilson says that, ultimately, the campaign is about good communication between individuals, their loved ones and health professionals.

‘Advance care planning emphasises the value of having open and courageous conversations early. That might include who you want with you when you are very ill, how much treatment you would like and types of treatment you would prefer not to have, and who can make decisions on your behalf if you’re not able to.

‘This makes it much easier for everyone to know what matters to you - especially if you can no longer speak for yourself.’

You can do your advance care plan now online, at this website: www.myacp.org.nz.

For more information, see the Commission's website.

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Howard Davis:
Entre-Deux-Guerres - Aldous Huxley's Crome Yellow - Pt I

Aldous Huxley's first novel, published in 1921, is a desiderium of a peculiarly English class of aristocrats and intellectuals who lived in an era that withered away a century ago. More>>


Joseph Cederwall: WOMAD - Love Will Lead Us Home

The events of Friday, moments before the gates opened cast an entirely different shadow over the festival and highlight the importance of such events as a way of growing closer together. More>>

Howard Davis: The Puzzling Poetic Praxis of J.H. Prynne - Pt II

Given the historical and socio-cultural context from which Prynne's poetry emerged, a panoptical perspective on what his poems might be trying to say is indispensable to its comprehension. With some sequences this can be an exceptionally demanding challenge, requiring a great deal of perseverance, concentration, and endurance. More>>

Truth And Beauty: 2019 Ockham Book Award Finalists

The Cage by Lloyd Jones, This Mortal Boy by Fiona Kidman, All This By Chance by Vincent O’Sullivan, and The New Ships by Kate Duignan are shortlisted for the $53,000 Acorn Foundation Fiction Prize. More>>

ALSO:

Measles: Two Measles Cases Notified In Auckland

Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) is asking people who may have been exposed to measles in three public locations to be alert to symptoms. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland