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Kiwis to ‘Beanie Up’ this June to support stroke survivors

The Stroke Foundation of New Zealand is calling on people across the country to ‘Beanie Up’ this June in an effort to raise more than $100k to support their vital services to stroke survivors.

Launching on Monday 27 May, Beanie Up is a new and fun way to support stroke survivors, and their families/whānau and carers, while also getting something that is stylish and useful for winter.

Kiwis can buy a special Beanie Up beanie for just $10 (plus postage) at beanieup.co.nz

“With this beanie you’ll not only keep your head warm this winter, you’ll make a massive difference to lives of thousands of people at the same time - a true win-win,” says Mark Vivian, Stroke Foundation CEO.

Individuals, workplaces and community groups can also raise extra funds by running a Beanie Up event in June through Everyday Hero - using a link on the Beanie Up website.

Each year around 9,000 New Zealanders have a stroke - that’s one every hour. And that number is predicted to grow by 40% over the next decade.

The Stroke Foundation’s Community Stroke Advisor (CSA) service currently provides over 34,000 hours of support to approximate 4,000 stroke survivors every year. The Stroke Foundation plans to expand this service in 2019 and the Beanie Up campaign will play a major part in supporting the funding for the service over the long term.

The Stroke Foundation has 25 CSAs working across the country. CSAs discuss and develop a plan to meet a survivor’s needs and how to achieve their goals. They also provide support, information and advice to build knowledge and skills; liaise with stroke clubs, community and recreational groups; and network in the community to ensure stroke survivors are getting the right services.



Stroke can strike at any age and most stroke survivors need long-term support to overcoming the huge physical and emotional challenges they are faced with after experiencing a stroke. The CSAs also supports family members who find themselves thrown in the deep-end, with little knowledge about how to be a carer and look after their loved one.

“It’s a massive adjustment for everyone, both physically and emotionally”, explains Mark Vivian. “Being there for the long term is incredibly important. For many, their CSA becomes part of the family.”

The Stroke Foundation is the only national charity in New Zealand focused on the prevention of and recovery from stroke. For almost 40 years they have actively promoted ways to avoid stroke and dedicated themselves to working closely with stroke survivors throughout New Zealand.

Beanie Up launches Monday 27 May and runs until 30 June. To purchase a beanie or run a fundraising event, visit beanieup.co.nz

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