News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

Press Council: Statement Of Principles

Announcing the adoption by the New Zealand Press Council of a Statement of Principles, Sir John Jeffries the Council's Independent Chairman, said today the principles had been worked out over a period of 18 months following wide canvassing of opinions and research. Some of the wording was subject of quite vigorous debate and controversy.

The Statement of Principles comprises a preamble and lists 13 principles.

In its preamble it states: "There is no more important principle than freedom of expression. In a democratically governed society the public has a right to be informed, and much of that information comes from the media. Individuals also have rights, and sometimes they must be balanced against competing interests such as the public's right to know.

"The print media is jealous in guarding freedom f expression not just for publishers' sake but more importantly, in the public interest. In complaint resolution by the Council, freedom of expression and public interest will play dominant roles."

The Press Council, founded in 1972, to provide the public with an independent forum for resolution of complaints against the press, comprises six members representing the public, two appointed by the Newspaper Publishers' Association, two representing the journalists' union and a representative of the Magazine Publishers' Association. Its independent chairman is Sir John, a former judge of the High Court and a former Police Complaints Authority.

Until now the Council has not issued a formal document setting out the principles it is guided by in complaint resolution. Sir John said the principles do not amount to a rigid code, but can be used by complainants should they wish to provide a more precise guide to the nature of their complaints.

"In arriving at the final wording of the statement members of the Council believe they have got it right and that the principles will be a useful guide for both the public and the industry," Sir John said today. "We will look at the Statement again after 12 months to see how it worked in practice and whether any changes are required."

ENDS....

MEDIA RELEASE FROM THE NEW ZEALAND PRESS COUNCIL

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Legendary Bassist David Friesen Plays Wellington’s Newest Jazz Venue

Friesen is touring New Zealand to promote his latest album Another Time, Another Place, recorded live at Auckland's Creative Jazz Club in 2015. More>>

Howard Davis Review: The Father - Descending Into The Depths of Dementia

Florian Zeller's dazzling drama The Father explores the effects of a deeply unsettling illness that affects 62,000 Kiwis, a number expected to grow to 102,000 by 2030. More>>


Howard Davis Review: Blade Runner Redivivus

When Ridley Scott's innovative, neo-noir, sci-fi flick Blade Runner was originally released in 1982, at a cost of over $45 million, it was a commercial bomb. More>>

14-21 October: New Zealand Improv Festival In Wellington

Imagined curses, Shibuya’s traffic, the apocalypse, and motherhood have little in common, but all these and more serve as inspiration for the eclectic improvised offerings coming to BATS Theatre this October for the annual New Zealand Improv Festival. More>>

ALSO:

Bird Of The Year Off To A Flying Start

The competition asks New Zealanders to vote for their favourite bird in the hopes of raising awareness of the threats they face. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Jenny Abrahamson's John & Charles Enys: Castle Hill Runholders, 1864-1891

This volume will be of interest to a range of readers interested in the South Island high country, New Zealand’s natural environment, and the history of science. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION