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New Technology Converts Atmospheric Heat To Power

Entropy Systems' New Technology Converts Atmospheric Heat To Electricity

Production and consumption of energy is the largest business in the world. After seven years and $3.4 million, Entropy Systems Inc., (ESI) has developed engine technology that produces power, by absorbing heat from atmospheric air, that can be at any temperature (even sub- zero). No fossil fuels or any nuclear materials are required to operate these engines and therefore they do not produce any pollution. In other words ESI engines are Room Temperature Superconductors of heat. ESI engines require no cryogenic liquids or any fuel storage systems and can be used to run Automobiles, Boats, Lawnmowers and Generators.

Conventional engines can only convert high temperature heat to power, which is produced by burning fossil fuels. The ESI engine takes room temperature air, absorbs heat from the air like a sponge, converts that heat to power and exhausts air at a lower temperature. This low-temperature exhaust can be used for Refrigeration and Air Conditioning. Thus the ESI engine is both an Engine and a Refrigerator. An electric generator coupled to this engine produces electricity. ESI engines can operate year round in any kind of weather and have efficiencies higher than any conventional engines, refrigerators and Fuel Cells.

Patents on this technology are approved by the United States of America, Australia and the European Economic Community. Sanjay Amin is the inventor of this technology. His book on Thermodynamics was published in 1994 and he also received the ASEI, Engineer of the year award in 1996. Sanjay also has several patents to his name. Tests on developmental prototypes were conducted at Youngstown State University, Purdue University and Pennsylvania State University. Youngstown State University's Cushwa Center for Enterpreneurship helped launch ESI. Larry Armstrong of Businessweek magazine writes, "Almost everyone in the 21st century is going to have a personal power-plant."


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