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AMP & Good Returns Launch Superannuation Website

AMP And Good Returns Launch Website To Drive Superannuation Debate

Online finance magazine Good Returns and leading financial services company AMP have joined forces to launch a new website to promote New Zealandersviews on retirement savings. The site, at www.supertalk.co.nz, was launched today.

www.supertalk.co.nz is interactive. Visitors to the site this week will be asked to vote in a poll on the first topic for debate: Should New Zealand Superannuation be a universal entitlement or a means tested benefit??

The innovative site also features commentary, opinion, policy and a discussion forum.

AMP General Manager John Drabble says www.supertalk.co.nz is an important vehicle for stimulating debate on superannuation in New Zealand.

Because of the uncertain framework on superannuation, some people aren't doing anything to prepare financially for their future and that's a real concern, says Mr Drabble.

However regardless of whether the parties debating superannuation reach a consensus or not, the issue of planning for retirement is clearly one which affects every New Zealander. That's why everyone needs to take responsibility for this issue and I encourage you to contribute to the debate at www.supertalk.co.nz, he says.

Good Returns/Supertalk editor Philip Macalister says supertalk.co.nz is ground breaking in the way it tackles superannuation. Instead of just providing a discussion forum, the site will have a broad range of resources, including: - columns - regular news coverage - political parties' superannuation policies - analysis of those policies - polls - discussion forum.

"In the past, for instance around the referendum, debate tended to get diverted away from the major issues onto some of the peripheral ones. We plan to break Superannuation into its various components, and have articles and debates on the constituent parts. The idea is that the debate would remain focussed on the key issues," Mr Macalister says.

"By better educating readers it will become easier to establish broad consensus around the key issues."


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